Resistance Training, Part 5: Training Load and Repetition

8 Oct

Load is the amount of weight lifted (pushed or pulled) during an exercise set.  It is an important component of a resistance training program.

There is an inverse relationship between load and repetitions.  The heavier the load lifted, the fewer the number of repetitions that can be performed.  Load is usually described in one of two ways:

  • One-repetition maximum (1RM) is the greatest amount of weight that can be lifted with proper technique for only one repetition.
  • Repetition maximum (RM) is the most weight that can be lifted for a specified number of repetitions.  For example, if an athlete can perform 10 repetitions with 200 lbs in the bench press exercise, his or her 10RM is 200 lbs.

There are a few different ways for the Strength and Conditioning professional to assess and determine an athlete’s training load:

  • Actual 1RM (directly tested).
  • Estimated 1RM from a multiple-RM test; there are prediction equations and tables available to estimate the 1RM from multiple-RM loads. (see NSCA website)
  • Multiple-RM based on the number of repetitions planned for that exercise (the goal).

Load and repetition assignments should be based on the athlete’s training goal.

  • If the athlete’s goal is Strength development, loads (%1RM) should be 85% or more; repetitions should be 6 or fewer.
  • If the athlete’s goal is Power development, loads should be 75-90%; repetitions should be in the 2-4 range.
  • If the athlete’s goal is Hypertrophy (muscle growth), loads should be 67-85%; repetitions should be in the 6-12 range.
  • If the athlete’s goal is Muscular endurance, loads should be 67% or less; repetitions should be 12 or more.

As the athlete adapts to the training load and repetitions, it’s important for the Strength and Conditioning professional to have a progression strategy.  Advancing exercise loads ensures that improvements will continue over time.  It is necessary for the trainer and athlete to monitor and chart each workout and the athlete’s response to it.

A conservative method that can be used to increase an athlete’s training load is called the 2-for-2 rule.  If the athlete can perform two or more repetitions over his or her assigned repetition goal in the last set in two consecutive workouts for a certain exercise, weight should be added to that exercise for the next training session.  (Baechle, T. and Earle, R.; Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning)

The quantity of load increases, when progression is warranted, should generally be about 2.5-10%.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Next: Volume

Advertisements

11 Responses to “Resistance Training, Part 5: Training Load and Repetition”

  1. Tammy Gibson October 8, 2012 at 6:36 AM #

    Very informative. Thanks. Tammy

    ________________________________

  2. athletic greens review October 17, 2012 at 2:48 PM #

    Hi would you mind letting me know which web host you’re using? I’ve loaded your
    blog in 3 completely different internet browsers and I must say this blog loads a lot faster then most.
    Can you suggest a good hosting provider at a reasonable
    price? Cheers, I appreciate it!

    • Brian Lebo October 17, 2012 at 4:43 PM #

      I am using the free version of WordPress. Thanks for reading my blog. Please share with others.

  3. Bridgette Breznay October 28, 2012 at 1:45 PM #

    I just want to say I am just new to blogging and honestly enjoyed you’re blog. Probably I’m likely to bookmark your blog . You certainly come with very good stories. Thank you for sharing your website page.

    • Brian Lebo October 28, 2012 at 4:49 PM #

      Thanks for visiting my blog… I appreciate your feedback. I hope you will follow my blog and share it with others.

  4. Latisha Harting October 29, 2012 at 8:30 AM #

    I just want to tell you that I am beginner to blogs and actually enjoyed you’re web page. Probably I’m want to bookmark your blog . You really come with tremendous stories. Kudos for revealing your website page.

    • Brian Lebo October 29, 2012 at 10:46 AM #

      Thanks for visiting my blog… I appreciate your feedback. I hope you will follow my blog and share it with others.

  5. Casino November 1, 2012 at 4:38 PM #

    I have recently started a site, the info you offer on this web site has helped me greatly. Thanks for all of your time & work. “Cultivation to the mind is as necessary as food to the body.” by Marcus Tullius Cicero.

  6. no no hair removal November 1, 2012 at 7:53 PM #

    excellent issues altogether, you just received a new reader. What might you suggest about your post that you just made some days in the past? Any sure?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. How Hard Should You Push Yourself? « Athletic Performance Training Center - January 17, 2013

    […] evidence-based research to support a specific plan for each (please see previous posts on volume, load, and repetition).  There is virtually no evidence to support exercising to the point of exhaustion; more is not […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: