Make Things More Challenging

2 Nov

As a boy, Stephen Curry played basketball in his grandfather’s gravel driveway, as did his father, Dell.

“If you can dribble and control the ball off that gravel,” Curry says, “you’ll be all right on hardwood.”

Even now when Curry trains, he adds elements that make the game harder, so when he’s in that moment of competition in a real game, it should be easier.

Here are some examples of basketball drills with an added degree of difficulty:

  • Ball handling and shooting with an over-sized basketball
  • Ball handling with a weighted basketball
  • Ball handling with two basketballs
  • Over-speed ball handling
  • Ball handling with “blinders”
  • Shooting on a smaller (diameter) rim
  • Shooting with a quicker-than-normal release
  • Ball handling and defensive footwork drills with banded resistance

This strategy lends itself to other sports, as well.

Hockey and soccer players can practice shooting into smaller nets.  They can also practice puck/ball handling with a variety of obstacles, including banded resistance.

Baseball players can take batting practice from a shorter than regulation distance, while maintaining pitch velocity.  Also, batting practice from close range with golf ball-sized wiffle balls and/or a thunderstick (practice bat with a handle-sized barrel diameter) is a great way to improve hand-eye coordination.  Fielding practice gloves — which are flat like pancakes and don’t “close” — can accelerate the development of proper, sure-handed fielding.

Improve your game by adding a degree of difficulty to your practice drills.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Make Things More Challenging”

  1. Tony November 2, 2015 at 6:57 AM #

    This sounds like a great idea for building abilities at sports. I don’t see why it wouldn’t work for any physical skill building that you want to do.

    • Brian Lebo November 2, 2015 at 9:28 AM #

      Agreed, Tony. I’ve seen it work with my own children and many of the athletes I train. Thanks for the feedback!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: