Tag Archives: clean eating

Don’t Let the Scale Define You

23 Sep

weight-loss[1]While I realize (statistics indicate) the average American can stand to lose a few pounds, the scale doesn’t always tell the entire story.

Your body weight is not a reflection of your worth.  It’s more productive to focus on eating clean (and not overeating), exercising, improving strength and mobility, increasing energy, and NOT a number on a scale.

There’s not necessarily a definitive relationship between body weight and overall health.  A person can have a healthy body weight, yet eat (qualitatively) poorly and be relatively physically inactive.

I don’t do a lot with scales and body weight at our facility.  I would rather concentrate on how people feel, function, and perform.  Keep in mind muscle takes up less space but weighs more than fat.

“Healthy” is not limited to any particular shape, size, or weight.  At least some of that is determined by genetics, anyway.

Part of the problem is our referent.  We try to compare ourselves with others  — unfairly and unrealistically —  instead of aspiring toward self-improvement: being better today than we were yesterday.

We all want to look and feel good, but the fads and gimmicks we chase to get there are not the answer.  In simple terms, eat cleaner, eat less, be more active, and exercise more.

An examination of ounces and pounds shouldn’t start your day any more than it should end it.  Don’t let the scale deflate your efforts if you know you’re on the right track with your nutrition and exercise plans.

Even if weight loss is part of your plan (and it’s okay if it is), detach the number on the scale from how you feel about you.  Be fair to yourself, eat well, stay active, and stay on track.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Eat More of These Power Foods

17 Apr

top-10-fat-burning-foods[1]If you’re looking to maximize the return on your nutritional investment — and I know you are — you don’t have to look much further than these power foods.

These foods will energize you; cut your risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, and other diseases; strengthen your immune system; relieve pain and reduce inflammation; help your muscles recover after exercise; and boost brain function.

  • Apples — contain quercetin, a tissue-protecting antioxidant, and a dose of belly-filling fiber.
  • Bananas — for fiber and potassium.
  • Beans — a great source of fiber, protein, vitamin B, zinc, iron, and magnesium.
  • Berries — loaded with heart-healthy, cancer-fighting antioxidants.
  • Dark Cherries — ease inflammation, relieve pain, and can help you sleep better.
  • Dark Leafy Greenskale and spinach are great sources of iron, calcium, vitamins A, C, and K, and folate.
  • Salmon — heart-healthy omega-3s (good fats) and serotonin (a good-mood neurotransmitter)
  • Kiwi — as much potassium as a banana and more vitamin C than an orange
  • Oatmeal — add it to your protein shakes for more fiber and omega-3s.
  • Whole Grains — healthier carbs like brown rice and quinoa (a complete protein).
  • Yogurt — especially the Greek variety.
  • Spices — like ginger, mustard, garlic, and honey.
  • Black and Green Teas — can lower stress and block fat absorption.
  • Avocados — rich in “healthy” fat and powerful anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Eggs — eat this “smart” food for the vitamin D and choline.
  • Beets — high in fiber, magnesium, and vitamin C, and may help reduce blood pressure.
  • Nuts — like almonds and pistachios, make a great snack.
  • Chocolate — the dark variety gets all the good press, but new research shows that milk chocolate also lowers risk of heart disease.

Add some of these foods to this week’s grocery list.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Don’t Let the Scale Define You

10 Dec

weight-loss[1]While I realize (statistics indicate) the average American can stand to lose a few pounds, the scale doesn’t always tell the entire story.

Your body weight is not a reflection of your worth.  It’s more productive to focus on eating clean (and not overeating), exercising, improving strength and mobility, increasing energy, and NOT a number on a scale.

There’s not necessarily a definitive relationship between body weight and overall health.  A person can have a healthy body weight, yet eat (qualitatively) poorly and be relatively physically inactive.

We don’t do a lot with scales and body weight at our facility.  We would rather concentrate on how people feel, function, and perform.  Keep in mind muscle takes up less space but weighs more than fat.

“Healthy” is not limited to any particular shape, size, or weight.  At least some of that is determined by genetics, anyway.

Part of the problem is our referent.  We try to compare ourselves with others  — unfairly and unrealistically —  instead of aspiring toward self-improvement: being better today than we were yesterday.

We all want to look and feel good, but the fads and gimmicks we chase to get there are not the answer.  In simple terms, eat cleaner, eat less, be more active, and exercise more.

An examination of ounces and pounds shouldn’t start your day any more than it should end it.  Don’t let the scale deflate your efforts if you know you’re on the right track with your nutrition and exercise plans.

Even if weight loss is part of your plan (and it’s okay if it is), detach the number on the scale from how you feel about you.  Be fair to yourself, eat well, stay active, and stay on track.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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