Tag Archives: CSCS

Work with a Trainer for Better Results

28 Aug

Have you ever wondered if working with a strength coach or personal trainer is right for you or your children, or worth the money?  Well, according to research from UCLA, a personal trainer can help make you much stronger than exercising on your own.

In the study, individuals who worked with a strength/fitness coach gained more muscle and 10% more endurance than those who chose to follow their own program.  They also gained six times more leg power than the “do it yourself” group.

The reason for the difference?  A qualified, experienced strength and conditioning professional can provide an expert-guided plan, helping you to stick to your workout and do it right.  Most individuals lack the experience and expertise to develop a personalized plan that incorporates appropriate exercise selectionintensity levelrepetitionssets, and rest intervals.  Additionally, a coach can motivate you to train harder and help keep you accountable.

Even if working with a trainer is not in your long-term plans, it can be a good idea to start there.  A trainer can better point you in the right direction, providing instruction, demonstration, and making your workouts more focused and effective when you do them on your own.

And, for you parents of student-athletes, be wary of the teacher or coach acting as your child’s trainer, or your school’s weight room attendant.  Typically, these folks are no more qualified than you are when it comes to developing well-designed and -supervised, safe, and effective strength and conditioning programs.

When looking for a strength coach/trainer, do your homework.  Since basically anyone can “hang a shingle” and call him/herself a trainer, it’s important to find one with a certification such as CSCS (Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist) or CPT (Certified Personal Trainer) through a nationally/internationally accredited organization like the NSCA (National Strength and Conditioning Association).  If you’re in or around the greater Cleveland (OH) area, check us out at AthleticPerformanceTC.com.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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Work with a Trainer for Better Results

7 Apr

nba_ap_tgrover1_600[1]Have you ever wondered if working with a strength coach or personal trainer is right for you or your children, or worth the money?  Well, according to new research from UCLA, a personal trainer can help make you much stronger than exercising on your own.

In the study, individuals who worked with a strength/fitness coach gained more muscle and 10% more endurance than those who chose to follow their own program.  They also gained six times more leg power than the “do it yourself” group.

The reason for the difference?  A qualified, experienced strength and conditioning professional can provide an expert-guided plan, helping you to stick to your workout and do it right.  Most individuals lack the experience and expertise to develop a personalized plan that incorporates appropriate exercise selection, intensity level, repetitions, sets, and rest intervals.  Additionally, a coach can motivate you to train harder and help keep you accountable.

Even if working with a trainer is not in your long-term plans, it can be a good idea to start there.  A trainer can better point you in the right direction, providing instruction, demonstration, and making your workouts more focused and effective when you do them on your own.

And, for you parents of student-athletes, be wary of the teacher or coach acting as your child’s trainer, or your school’s weight room attendant.  Typically, these folks are no more qualified than you are when it comes to developing well-designed and -supervised, safe, and effective strength and conditioning programs.

When looking for a strength coach/trainer, do your homework.  Since basically anyone can “hang a shingle” and call him/herself a trainer, it’s important to find a well-accredited one at nsca.com (website for the National Strength and Conditioning Association).  Look for NSCA designations such as CSCS (Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist) or CPT (Certified Personal Trainer).  If you’re in or around the greater Cleveland (OH) area, check us out at AthleticPerformanceTC.com.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

What is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)

2 Aug

 What is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)?

The Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) is an individual who has attained certification and accreditation through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA); at least a bachelor’s degree, from an accredited college or university; and certification in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and in the use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

The CSCS has studied, completed extensive coursework, and been tested and certified by the NSCA, in the following areas:

Concepts and Applications of Exercise Sciences

  • Muscle Physiology
  • Neuromuscular Anatomy and Adaptations to Conditioning
  • The Biomechanics of Resistance Exercise
  • Bone, Muscle, and Connective Tissue Adaptations to Physical Activity
  • Bioenergetics of Exercise and Training
  • Endocrine Responses to Resistance Exercise
  • Cardiovascular and Respiratory Anatomy and Physiology: Responses to Exercise
  • Physiological Adaptations to Anaerobic and Aerobic Endurance Training Programs
  • Age- and Sex-Related Differences and Their Implications for Resistance Exercise
  • The Psychology of Athletic Preparation and Performance: The Mental Management of Physical Resources
  • Performance-Enhancing Substances: Effects, Risks, and Appropriate Alternatives
  • Nutritional Factors in Health and Performance
  • Eating Disorders and Obesity

Testing and Evaluation

  • Principles of Test Selection and Administration
  • Administration , Scoring, and Interpretation of Selected Tests

Exercise Techniques

  • Stretching and Warm-Up
  • Resistance Training and Spotting Techniques

Program Design

  • Anaerobic Exercise Prescription
    • Resistance Training
    • Plyometric Training
    • Speed, Agility, and Speed-Endurance Training
  • Aerobic Endurance Exercise Prescription
    • Aerobic Endurance Exercise Training
  • Applying Exercise Prescription Principles
    • Training Variation: Periodization
    • Rehabilitation and Reconditioning

Organization and Administration of the Strength Training and Conditioning Facility

  • Facility Layout and Scheduling
  • Developing a Policies and Procedures Manual
  • Facility Maintenance and Risk Management
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