Tag Archives: dehydration and athletic performance

Youth Athletes More Likely to Be Dehydrated

23 Aug

Dehydration is the number one cause of fatigue-related performance decline in athletes, including youth athletes.  Hydration — during activity (practices, games, etc.) — doesn’t seem to be adequate or effective enough to maintain hydration status. Therefore, it is imperative for coaches and parents to encourage hydration throughout the day — before, during (especially), and after activity.

The body is about 70% water, and small fluctuations in that percentage can make an impact, quickly. As water levels decline, so do the levels of nutrients needed to keep the body functioning effectively, such as salt and potassium.

Fatigue can occur when the volume of blood in the body is reduced as dehydration gets worse. That causes the heart to pump less efficiently. As dehydration progresses, the body has a more difficult time diffusing internal heat, and tension is created through the body in muscles, joints, and organs. That tension often manifests itself as fatigue.

Here’s an article from Health and Fitness News, based on a Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research study, titled, Youth Athletes More Likely to Be Dehydrated.  Thanks to my friend, Niki, for sharing this resource.

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Dehydration is a Performance Killer

12 Oct

4521366051[1]Plenty has been written about the importance of hydration and its effect on athletic performance.

Water affects athletic performance more than any other nutrient, and dehydration is the number one cause of performance-related fatigue and decline.

Adequate fluid balance is also important for optimal cognitive function and overall function as it relates to activities of daily living.

Multiple studies corroborate that dehydration impairs sprint performance, jump performance, resistance training, power production, recovery, and heart rate response.

Athletes:  It’s important to stay hydrated throughout the day — before, during, and after training, practices, and games — whether you feel thirsty or not.

Coaches/Trainers:  We’ve got to encourage hydration (via education) and incorporate hydration “stations” into athletes’ training, practices, and games, even (and especially) when they tell us they are “not thirsty.”

For more information, please refer to the following articles:

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Hydration, Water, and Electrolyte Replacement

21 Aug

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Water plays a crucial role in athletic performance, and dehydration adversely affects performance.

As a matter of fact, water affects athletic performance more than any other nutrient, and dehydration is the number one cause of performance-related decline.

For most of us — in most situations — water (consumed in ample quantities) is all we need to keep us hydrated.

Consuming adequate fluids before, during, and after training and competition is essential to optimal strength training, endurance aerobic exercise, and athletic performance.

There are, however, situations in which electrolyte replacement is warranted:

  • Hot, humid environmental conditions
  • High-intensity, physically rigorous activity
  • Extended duration of activity (45-60 minutes, or more)

Fluid replacement may also depend on the athlete, him- or herself, as there may be differences in ideal fluid replacement among and between athletes.

Any of these situations, alone or in combination, may precipitate a need for something more than water.  Sweat-induced fluid loss can create an electrolyte deficit — including sodium, (and, to a lesser extent) potassium, and magnesium.

Here’s some insight from Craig A. Horswill, PhD titled, Making Your Fluids Work Harder When You Work Hard.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

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Youth Athletes More Likely to Be Dehydrated

4 Apr

boy drinking waterDehydration is the number one cause of fatigue-related performance decline in athletes, including youth athletes.  Hydration — during activity (practices, games, etc.) — doesn’t seem to be adequate or effective enough to maintain hydration status. Therefore, it is imperative for coaches and parents to encourage hydration throughout the day — before, during (especially), and after activity.

The body is about 70% water, and small fluctuations in that percentage can make an impact, quickly. As water levels decline, so do the levels of nutrients needed to keep the body functioning effectively, such as salt and potassium.

Fatigue can occur when the volume of blood in the body is reduced as dehydration gets worse. That causes the heart to pump less efficiently. As dehydration progresses, the body has a more difficult time diffusing internal heat, and tension is created through the body in muscles, joints, and organs. That tension often manifests itself as fatigue.

Here’s an article from Health and Fitness News, based on a Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research study, titled, Youth Athletes More Likely to Be Dehydrated.  Thanks to my friend, Niki Pearce, for sharing this resource.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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