Tag Archives: diet moderation

Fat is not the Enemy

22 Oct

A few decades ago, “low-fat” and “fat-free” were all the rage.  The “experts” decided that dietary fat reduction would reduce obesity and heart disease.  Even the American Heart Association got behind this initiative.

Ironically, obesity rates and heart disease prevalence did not improve with a low-fat diet and, in fact, got worse.  That’s because eating fat doesn’t make us fat, but carbs and sugars do.  And, unfortunately, words like “low-fat” and “fat-free” often translate to “loaded with sugar.”

Additionally, our “super-size” mentality doesn’t help (nor does a sedentary lifestyle).  Portion control (or lack thereof) — overeating — remains a significant challenge in our country.

I’m not suggesting that we should increase our fat consumption, especially people who have health risks like high cholesterol, but certainly awareness and education are warranted.

Here’s an article — 5 Reasons why you need more fat in your diet — that provides some perspective.  Ultimately, fats and carbs have a different effect on the body and its propensity to store fat, and eating fat won’t necessarily make us fat; all fats (saturated, unsaturated) are not created equal; and moderation is still the key.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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Stay in the Game

8 Aug

NCAA FOOTBALL 2010: Oct 02 Wyoming at ToledoIt’s important for athletes (and everyone else) to take care of themselves, physically and mentally.  You can’t skip the basics of good physical and mental health and expect to perform at a high level.  Here are some tips to help you stay active:

Make exercise a habit.  If you do something on a regular basis, it becomes part of your life.  Regular exercise has demonstrated the ability to improve physical and mental well-being.

Take it easy.  Try to relax rather than putting a lot of stress on yourself.  When you’re relaxed, you’ll be better prepared and see things more clearly.

Listen to your body.  One of the biggest mistakes athletes make is coming back from injury too soon.  Take some time to allow your body to heal normally.

Don’t overdo it… moderation is the key.  Whether it’s your diet or exercise, avoid an extreme, fanatical approach and don’t go overboard.

Believe in you.  When you’re confident, it enhances a lot of things, including your physical and mental performance and achievement.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Fat is not the Enemy

25 Aug

3-FiveGuys_burgerandfries-FiveGuys[1]A few decades ago, “low-fat” and “fat-free” were all the rage.  The “experts” decided that dietary fat reduction would reduce obesity and heart disease.  Even the American Heart Association got behind this initiative.

Ironically, obesity rates and heart disease prevalence did not improve with a low-fat diet and, in fact, got worse.  That’s because eating fat doesn’t make us fat, but carbs and sugars do.  And, unfortunately, words like “low-fat” and “fat-free” often translate to “loaded with sugar.”

Additionally, our “super-size” mentality doesn’t help (nor does a sedentary lifestyle).  Portion control (or lack thereof) — overeating — remains a significant challenge in our country.

I’m not suggesting that we should increase our fat consumption, especially people who have health risks like high cholesterol, but certainly awareness and education are warranted.

Here’s an article — 5 Reasons why you need more fat in your diet — that provides some perspective.  Ultimately, fats and carbs have a different effect on the body and its propensity to store fat, and eating fat won’t necessarily make us fat; all fats (saturated, unsaturated) are not created equal; and moderation is still the key.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Stay in the Game

19 Jun

NCAA FOOTBALL 2010: Oct 02 Wyoming at ToledoIt’s important for athletes (and everyone else) to take care of themselves, physically and mentally.  You can’t skip the basics of good physical and mental health and expect to perform at a high level.  Here are some tips to help you stay active:

Make exercise a habit.  If you do something on a regular basis, it becomes part of your life.  Regular exercise has demonstrated the ability to improve physical and mental well-being.

Take it easy.  Try to relax rather than putting a lot of stress on yourself.  When you’re relaxed, you’ll be better prepared and see things more clearly.

Listen to your body.  One of the biggest mistakes athletes make is coming back from injury too soon.  Take some time to allow your body to heal normally.

Don’t overdo it… moderation is the key.  Whether it’s your diet or exercise, avoid an extreme, fanatical approach and don’t go overboard.

Believe in you.  When you’re confident, it enhances a lot of things, including your physical and mental performance and achievement.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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