Tag Archives: discipline

Think Like an Athlete

9 Oct

Being an athlete is about more than just strengthspeedagility, and athleticism (although the development of those characteristics is certainly important).  It even goes beyond the genetics and “natural” ability with which you have been blessed.

Being an athlete is also about how you think; how you practice; how you talk (especially self-talk); how you act; and how you dream.

Being an athlete is about setting challenging goals — and working hard toward the achievement of those goals, every day.

Being an athlete is about realizing your long-term objectives and having the discipline to stick to your plan.

Being an athlete means being aware that there will be obstacles along the way, and having the mental toughness to overcome adversity.

Being an athlete involves visualizing yourself succeeding, and positive, encouraging self-talk, along the way.

Being an athlete requires a commitment to constantly improve upon your performance.

Being an athlete means focusing on improving you, and not comparing yourself with others — being better today than you were yesterday.

Here’s a great read from Huffington Post titled, 8 Ways to Think Like an Athlete.  The article does a nice job of expanding upon some of the thoughts discussed above.  If you are — or aspire to be — an athlete, it’s a “must-read.”  And it doesn’t just apply to athletics.  The same principles can be applied to school, work, and life.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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Remember Why You’re There

21 Sep

img-about-21As my daughter – and fourth of four children – begins her freshman year of college, I resume my familiar place on my soapbox to impart a simple message:

REMEMBER WHY YOU’RE THERE

Enjoy the college experience.  Make new friends.  Participate in activities.  Join clubs and organizations.  Play sports and be active.

And, most importantly, maintain your focus and purpose.  Work hard to be the best – academically – you can be.

This same principle applies to other areas.

When you’re at basketball (or any other sport) practice, have fun and enjoy the camaraderie of your teammates.

And remember the reason you’re there is to improve your team’s performance, and further develop your sport-specific skills.

Wherever you are and whatever you do, there’s nothing wrong with enjoying the experience along the way, as long as you don’t allow it to interfere with the work that needs to be done to reach your goal.

Be diligent and disciplined about the process, and don’t lose sight of the reason you’re there.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

How Do You Motivate Yourself?

28 Dec

12307969-standard[2]“Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right.” – Henry Ford

Before you can accomplish anything, you’ve got to believe you can. And before you can believe in your ability, you have to develop a strong level of personal motivation.

The first step in motivating yourself is understanding what you want and why you want it. If this is less than clear, it will be difficult to maintain a high level of self-motivation. Goal setting is an important part of this process. It will help to provide direction and purpose. Once you set a goal, the next step is figuring out how you’re going to accomplish it.

Action planning is the bridge between goal-setting and accomplishment.  You need to create a plan that is aligned with your goals.

Get started… stop procrastinating. The thought of change can seem overwhelming, but taking that first step is necessary and gratifying.  The key to overcoming procrastination is to focus on the process rather than on the outcomes — shift your focus from the outcome to your immediate efforts.  Success will come once you have mastered the process of acting in the moment.

Long-term planning can help to make your goal more attainable. Quantum change doesn’t occur overnight, so “chunk down” your goal by setting incremental achievement points along the way — and then celebrate those small victories. Setting checkpoints along the way will also allow you to adjust your approach or strategy, if necessary.

Change usually involves changing your habits.  Initially, it takes a lot of motivation to make a change in your habits, but you can do it with discipline.  Although it’s easier said than done, you need to replace your bad habits with better habits.

Improve your self-esteem by taking responsibility for your actions,developing your strengths, and eliminating negative influences.

Build self-confidence by facing your fears, recalling past successes,building upon small successes, and creating a supportive environment.  Reinforce positive behavior and goal-attainment, and keep the momentum going.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

5 Reasons to Never Miss a Monday Workout

30 Nov

Modivational-Monday-42Shout out to our friends from ASD Performance for this resource:

1. You’re more likely to work out the rest of the week.

Exercising on Mondays can get the ball rolling for your workout routine. There’s something about starting on a Monday that makes you feel like you’re off to the right start.

2. You’ll smile more.

Got a case of the Mondays? You’re not alone. Research shows that the average office worker doesn’t crack a smile until 11:16 a.m. But exercise could help you beat those Monday blues. One common benefit of physical exercise is that it releases endorphins, the hormones that make you feel happier. Nothing feels as great as a finished workout, right?

3. You’ll quell anxious thoughts.

Dreading that mountain of paperwork gathering dust on your desk over the weekend? It’s not uncommon to feel apprehensive about heading in to work. But don’t go hiding back under the covers just yet — you may want to hop on the treadmill for a few miles instead. Studies show that aerobic exercise can lessen general anxiety. Plus, high-intensity exercise has been shown to reduce anxiety sensitivity, or the fear of anxiety that is often a precursor to panic attacks.

4. You’ll kickstart good self-control.

It may take some willpower to lace up those sneakers, but exercise is actually a great way to harness more discipline for other areas of your life. Moving around for as little as 15 minutes has been shown to help people manage cigarette cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Why? Exercise releases GABA, a neurotransmitter that helps keep you in control of impulses and can quiet anxious brain activity.

5. You might make more money.

Lifting weights may not lead to an immediate promotion, but it can’t hurt your chances at some extra cash. One study found an association between gym habits and higher pay. Employees who exercised regularly earned nine percent more than their couch potato peers. Cha-ching!

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Do the Work

4 Nov

alex%20gordon[1]The people who work hard and work smart are usually the ones who are most successful.

There’s really no way to cheat the system.  You either do the work and reap the benefits, or you take shortcuts and hope for the best.

Although the path to success may look different for any two people, once thing is certain:  You’ve got to put in the time and do the work.

Believe in you.  Believe that you can.

Get started and keep going — keep working toward your goal.

Embrace the challenge.  Chase your dream.

Practice, practice, practice until you can’t miss.  Then practice some more.

Be disciplined, enthusiastic, and passionate about your work.

Your success already exists in potential.  Work to find it.

Commit yourself to action, and don’t stop.

The time is going to pass regardless of how you spend it, so make it productive.

Begin now.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Characteristics of Mentally Tough Athletes

25 Feb

kevin-love[1]There are lots of different ways to describe and define mental toughness.  It can be described as the ability, willingness, and discipline to perform effectively and productively, regardless of the situation or circumstances.

Mental toughness involves positive thinking, focus, concentration, persistence, perseverance, and a strong belief in self.  It is the ability to ignore distractions, focus on what is important, and block out what is not.

Mental toughness is working through adversity, overcoming obstacles, and refusing to give up or give in.

And, although the focus of this blog post primarily relates to athletes, mental toughness does not apply only to athletes.  Since we all face obstacles and adversity, mental toughness can be an asset to students, business professionals, teachers, coaches, parents, and any other situation or life experience.

Here’s a list of 10 Characteristics of a Mentally Tough Player, excerpted from the article, Developing Mental Toughness:

  1. Doesn’t let one bad play lead into another. Short memory.
  2. Is able to take constructive criticism from a coach or teammate with the right attitude.
  3. Is still able to be a good leader even when they aren’t personally playing well.
  4. Is able to run offense and execute the correct play even when they are physically tired.
  5. Still shoots the basketball with great form and technique when they are physically fatigued.
  6. Doesn’t check out of a game that they are losing, and looks like there is no chance to win.
  7. Doesn’t complain about something being too difficult, but finds a way to get through it.
  8. Stays patient and is able to run offense even when being pressured by the defense.
  9. Stays in control of emotions and doesn’t let the size of the stage negatively effect them.
  10. Doesn’t put in the bare minimum during conditioning, but looks to try and win every sprint.

Thanks to my friend, Laurel Heilman of STUDENTathleteWorld, for sharing this information.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Think Like an Athlete

5 May

article1[1]Being an athlete is about more than just strength, speed, agility, and athleticism (although the development of those characteristics is certainly important).  It even goes beyond the genetics and “natural” ability with which you have been blessed.

Being an athlete is also about how you think; how you practice; how you talk (especially self-talk); how you act; and how you dream.

Being an athlete is about setting challenging goals — and working hard toward the achievement of those goals, every day.

Being an athlete is about realizing your long-term objectives and having the discipline to stick to your plan.

Being an athlete means being aware that there will be obstacles along the way, and having the mental toughness to overcome adversity.

Being an athlete involves visualizing yourself succeeding, and positive, encouraging self-talk, along the way.

Being an athlete requires a commitment to constantly improve upon your performance.

Being an athlete means focusing on improving you, and not comparing yourself with others — being better today than you were yesterday.

Here’s a great read from Huffington Post titled, 8 Ways to Think Like an Athlete.  The article does a nice job of expanding upon some of the thoughts discussed above.  If you are — or aspire to be — an athlete, it’s a “must-read.”  And it doesn’t just apply to athletics.  The same principles can be applied to school, work, and life.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

How Do You Motivate Yourself?

6 Mar

12307969-standard[2]“Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right.” – Henry Ford

Before you can accomplish anything, you’ve got to believe you can. And before you can believe in your ability, you have to develop a strong level of personal motivation.

The first step in motivating yourself is understanding what you want and why you want it. If this is less than clear, it will be difficult to maintain a high level of self-motivation. Goal setting is an important part of this process. It will help to provide direction and purpose. Once you set a goal, the next step is figuring out how you’re going to accomplish it.

Action planning is the bridge between goal-setting and accomplishment.  You need to create a plan that is aligned with your goals.

Get started… stop procrastinating. The thought of change can seem overwhelming, but taking that first step is necessary and gratifying.  The key to overcoming procrastination is to focus on the process rather than on the outcomes — shift your focus from the outcome to your immediate efforts.  Success will come once you have mastered the process of acting in the moment.  .

Long-term planning can help to make your goal more attainable. Quantum change doesn’t occur overnight, so “chunk down” your goal by setting incremental achievement points along the way — and then celebrate those small victories. Setting checkpoints along the way will also allow you to adjust your approach or strategy, if necessary.

Change usually involves changing your habits.  Initially, it takes a lot of motivation to make a change in your habits, but you can do it with discipline.  Although it’s easier said than done, you need to replace your bad habits with better habits.

Improve your self-esteem by taking responsibility for your actions, developing your strengths, and eliminating negative influences.

Build self-confidence by facing your fears, recalling past successes, building upon small successes, and creating a supportive environment.  Reinforce positive behavior and goal-attainment, and keep the momentum going.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

4 Keys to Success in the Weight Room

2 Nov

Want to improve your athletic performance?  Practice your sport-specific skills, eat right, and get in the weight room (see 3 Pillars of Athletic Performance).  Developing your strength, speed, agility, and athleticism can help you create a competitive advantage.  Get STRONGER, Get FASTER isn’t just a tag line; it’s a requisite component of your preparation for your sport(s) of choice.

Don’t waste time in the weight room.  As the saying goes, “plan your work and work your plan.”  Be productive, challenge yourself, and strive for quality and efficiency.  Follow these 4 keys to achieve success in the weight room:

Accountability

It’s on you.  You are responsible for your development.  No one can do it for you.  What you achieve (or fail to achieve) is largely a matter of choice.  Showing up is half the battle.  Get in, do work, get out, repeat.

Discipline

Your actions should be consistent with your goals.  Consistency is the key.  Do what needs to be done, as well as it can be done, and do it that way consistently.

Competitiveness

It’s you vs. you.  There’s no need to compare yourself with anyone else.  Be internally competitive.  Strive to be 1% better today than you were yesterday.  Same goes for tomorrow.  The results, over time, will be impressive.

Motivation

Refer to your goals frequently.  Reflect upon your inspiration.  Think about why you’re doing what you’re doing every time you train.  Dedication.  Determination.  Desire.  You gotta want it.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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