Tag Archives: egg protein

Whey is the Way to Go

29 Mar

When it comes to protein, athletes have lots of different options.  There’s protein from whole foods, like milk protein, egg protein, meat protein, and plant protein.  As a supplement, whey protein, casein protein, and soy protein are among the alternatives.

Additionally, research shows that different types of protein work better at different times of day (and night).

In the morning, whey protein from whole foods (milk, Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, etc.) or a whey protein powder shake can help control cravings all day, according to scientists at the Journal of Nutrition.

Whey is also a good choice for your pre- and post-workout protein because it is quickly and easily digestible.

Another option for your post-workout protein is casein.  Casein is the main protein found in milk and cheese.  Of the true proteins found in milk, about 80% is casein.  The other major protein in milk is whey.  Compared to whey, casein burns more slowly and provides a consistent flow of protein, over time (sort of like a “long-acting” protein).

There are several protein powder supplements that contain both whey and casein proteins (I know of at least one that also contains egg protein).

Studies also show that casein protein, when taken before bed, can increase muscle growth by about 20%.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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The Incredible, Edible Egg

9 Mar

Hard-Boiled-Eggs-550x430[1]Yes, I know I borrowed their tagline but, seriously, eat an egg.  Better yet, eat a few of them.  Eggs are an inexpensive, delicious food source that play a role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, and eye health.

At only 70 calories per egg, you get 6 grams of high-quality protein; A, B, and D vitamins; choline (important for brain function and fat metabolism); and a host of other minerals and nutrients.  And eggs will keep you feeling full much longer than carb-heavy breakfasts like cereal and toast.

Eggs are a great choice for breakfast, (almost) any way you prepare them — scrambled, poached, fried, or even baked.  Research shows that consuming protein with breakfast is more beneficial than a breakfast devoid of protein.  And eggs aren’t just for breakfast.  Chopped, boiled eggs can be added to salads, and used to make egg salad (which is my lunch of choice on Lenten Fridays).

If you’re a morning workout person and want to get  some high-quality protein in your post-workout breakfast, you can’t do much better than eggs.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Add an Egg to Your Protein Shake

8 Dec

egg[1]Next time you prepare a post-workout drink, crack an egg (or two) in your whey protein shake.

Egg protein is a high-quality, lactose-free protein source, and makes a great complement to whey protein.  Egg protein stimulates muscle growth and has been demonstrated to increase muscle protein synthesis in university studies.

The egg white and yolk proteins are high in nutrients; one large egg contains about 6.5 grams of protein; and the egg white protein content is about 3.6 grams (slightly more than half of the total protein content).

Egg Protein Benefits

Eggs contain a high concentration of leucine.  Leucine is the major amino acid responsible for stimulating the synthesis of muscle protein after a meal (the only protein source that contains more leucine than egg is whey).

Egg protein contains 10% to 20% more leucine than most other protein sources.  It is more anabolic (muscle-building) than both soy and wheat protein.  Egg protein increases lean-body mass more than both of those protein sources — even at equal intakes.

Egg protein is quickly and easily digestible, at a rate similar to whey protein.  Consumption and digestion of egg protein leads to a large increase in plasma amino acids and commensurate muscle-building response.

Consuming egg protein promotes satiety (fullness) and can reduce short-term food intake, which may be beneficial for people looking to lose fat — but don’t want to feel like they’re starving themselves in the process.

Egg protein is also a great source of important vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Whey is the Way to Go

29 Nov

optimum-nutrition-casein-protein[1]When it comes to protein, athletes have lots of different options.  There’s protein from whole foods, like milk protein, egg protein, meat protein, and plant protein.  As a supplement, whey protein, casein protein, and soy protein are among the alternatives.

Additionally, research shows that different types of protein work better at different times of day (and night).

In the morning, whey protein from whole foods (milk, Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, etc.) or a whey protein powder shake can help control cravings all day, according to scientists at the Journal of Nutrition.

Whey is also a good choice for your pre- and post-workout protein because it is quickly and easily digestible.

Another option for your post-workout protein is casein.  Casein is the main protein found in milk and cheese.  Of the true proteins found in milk, about 80% is casein.  The other major protein in milk is whey.  Compared to whey, casein burns more slowly and provides a consistent flow of protein, over time (sort of like a “long-acting” protein).

There are several protein powder supplements that contain both whey and casein proteins (I know of at least one that also contains egg protein).

Studies also show that casein protein, when taken before bed, can increase muscle growth by about 20%.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

The Incredible, Edible Egg

27 Feb

Hard-Boiled-Eggs-550x430[1]Yes, I know I borrowed their tagline but, seriously, eat an egg.  Better yet, eat a few of them.  Eggs are an inexpensive, delicious food source that play a role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, and eye health.

At only 70 calories per egg, you get 6 grams of high-quality protein; A, B, and D vitamins; choline (important for brain function and fat metabolism); and a host of other minerals and nutrients.  And eggs will keep you feeling full much longer than carb-heavy breakfasts like cereal and toast.

Eggs are a great choice for breakfast, (almost) any way you prepare them — scrambled, poached, fried, or even baked.  Research shows that consuming protein with breakfast is more beneficial than a breakfast devoid of protein.  And eggs aren’t just for breakfast.  Chopped, boiled eggs can be added to salads, and used to make egg salad (which is my lunch of choice on Lenten Fridays).

If you’re a morning workout person and want to get  some high-quality protein in your post-workout breakfast, you can’t do much better than eggs.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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