Tag Archives: exercise science

Choosing a Strength Coach or Personal Trainer

12 Feb

Would you send your child to a physician who had never been to medical school?  How about a doctor who was never certified in his or her field?

When choosing a strength coach or personal trainer, I would encourage you to apply the same selection criteria.

Since the industry is not regulated, anyone can self-proclaim the title, personal trainer or strength coach.  Much like professionals in other industries, strength and conditioning professionals should have a working knowledge of foundational exercise science and its practical application.

Here are a few things to consider when choosing a strength coach or personal trainer:

  • Educational background that includes Exercise Science or Human Performance
  • Accredited Certification (through an organization like the NSCA)
  • Personal Liability Insurance (it’s expensive, but protects both trainer and client)
  • Experience, Expertise (knowledgeable, reputable, credible — ask for references)
  • Training Philosophy

Do your homework, choose appropriately — based on your needs and goals, and inspect what you expect.

Get STRONGER Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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Choosing a Strength Coach or Personal Trainer

6 Jun
CSCS Logo

CSCS Logo

Would you send your child to a physician who had never been to medical school?  How about a doctor who was never certified in his or her field?

When choosing a strength coach or personal trainer, I would encourage you to apply the same selection criteria.

Since the industry is not regulated, anyone can self-proclaim the title, personal trainer or strength coach.  Much like professionals in other industries, strength and conditioning professionals should have a working knowledge of foundational exercise science and its practical application.

Here are a few things to consider when choosing a strength coach or personal trainer:

  • Educational background that includes Exercise Science or Human Performance
  • Accredited Certification (through an organization like the NSCA)
  • Personal Liability Insurance (it’s expensive, but protects both trainer and client)
  • Experience, Expertise (knowledgeable, reputable, credible — ask for references)
  • Training Philosophy

Do your homework, choose appropriately — based on your needs and goals, and inspect what you expect.

Get STRONGER Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

I Am Thankful

23 Nov

As I sit at my computer late on Thanksgiving night, I realize I have a lot for which to be thankful – personally and professionally.  It’s not that I don’t think about this most days, but this time of year brings it much more “front of mind.”  I am thankful for the many opportunities my business has afforded me.

I am thankful for the opportunity to work with so many wonderful people.

I am thankful for the opportunity to contribute to people’s growth, development, and success.

I am thankful for the relationships and friendships I have formed through my business.

I am thankful for the support of so many customers and families.

I am thankful for people believing in me enough to refer me to their relatives and friends.

I am thankful for the opportunity to teach, coach, train, and develop others.

I am thankful for the opportunity to operate my business from within a big, beautiful fieldhouse.

I am thankful for the opportunity to mentor young men and women interested in Exercise Science and Human Performance.

I am thankful for the opportunity to learn from others, every day.

I am thankful for the support and guidance of a great organization like the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

I am truly blessed and thankful, in more ways than I can acknowledge.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

What is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)

2 Aug

 What is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)?

The Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) is an individual who has attained certification and accreditation through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA); at least a bachelor’s degree, from an accredited college or university; and certification in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and in the use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

The CSCS has studied, completed extensive coursework, and been tested and certified by the NSCA, in the following areas:

Concepts and Applications of Exercise Sciences

  • Muscle Physiology
  • Neuromuscular Anatomy and Adaptations to Conditioning
  • The Biomechanics of Resistance Exercise
  • Bone, Muscle, and Connective Tissue Adaptations to Physical Activity
  • Bioenergetics of Exercise and Training
  • Endocrine Responses to Resistance Exercise
  • Cardiovascular and Respiratory Anatomy and Physiology: Responses to Exercise
  • Physiological Adaptations to Anaerobic and Aerobic Endurance Training Programs
  • Age- and Sex-Related Differences and Their Implications for Resistance Exercise
  • The Psychology of Athletic Preparation and Performance: The Mental Management of Physical Resources
  • Performance-Enhancing Substances: Effects, Risks, and Appropriate Alternatives
  • Nutritional Factors in Health and Performance
  • Eating Disorders and Obesity

Testing and Evaluation

  • Principles of Test Selection and Administration
  • Administration , Scoring, and Interpretation of Selected Tests

Exercise Techniques

  • Stretching and Warm-Up
  • Resistance Training and Spotting Techniques

Program Design

  • Anaerobic Exercise Prescription
    • Resistance Training
    • Plyometric Training
    • Speed, Agility, and Speed-Endurance Training
  • Aerobic Endurance Exercise Prescription
    • Aerobic Endurance Exercise Training
  • Applying Exercise Prescription Principles
    • Training Variation: Periodization
    • Rehabilitation and Reconditioning

Organization and Administration of the Strength Training and Conditioning Facility

  • Facility Layout and Scheduling
  • Developing a Policies and Procedures Manual
  • Facility Maintenance and Risk Management

What to Look for in a Trainer

2 Aug

I’m occasionally asked by relatives and friends, who don’t live within a reasonable proximity of my facility, what they should look for in a trainer.  Naturally, I have somewhat of a bias.  Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your perspective), the field of Strength and Conditioning is not regulated.  This means that anyone can hang a shingle and claim to be a personal trainer or strength coach.  And, like any other profession, there are some very knowledgeable and reputable trainers and some, uh… not so good.  The internet age has certainly facilitated this phenomenon, enabling anyone to search Strength and Conditioning videos and implement what they see, without really understanding any of the foundational exercise science or practical application.

Here’s a short list of selection criteria for a Strength Coach/Trainer:

  • Educational Background (should include Exercise Science and Physiology)
  • Accredited Certification (through an organization like the NSCA)
  • First-Aid, CPR, AED Certification (better safe than sorry)
  • Personal Liability Insurance (it’s expensive, but protects both trainer and client)
  • Experience, Expertise (knowledgeable, reputable, credible)

I hope that’s helpful.  The list is not all-inclusive, nor is it intended to be absolute; just a starting point.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Welcome to My Blog

1 Aug

Well, after much thought and discussion (and some prodding), I’ve decided to start a blog.  I plan to share evidence-based, Strength and Conditioning information to help others reach their goals.  The information I share won’t necessarily be the “best” way, the “only” way, or the “right” way; but it will be supported by credible, reputable data from the field of Exercise Science and Physiology.  My blog will focus on (but not be limited to) Strength and Fitness; Speed and Agility; Diet and Nutrition; and I’ll also incorporate some Inspiration and Motivation.  Ultimately, I hope my passion, enthusiasm, experience, and expertise can benefit others to improve athletic performance, fitness, and/or nutrition.  You can follow my blog by clicking on the “Follow” button, and each new post will be sent directly to your email address.  You can also follow me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please let me know what you think… I welcome your comments.  Thanks!

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

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