Tag Archives: free weights

Switch from Machines to Free Weights

5 Jun

There’s no argument that exercise machines are mostly convenient and easy-to-use.  Hop on, set your resistance level, and go to work.

However, recent research from the University of South Carolina (excerpted in Men’s Health) revealed that men who train with free weights are less likely to have lower back pain than those who use weight-training machines.

“With machines, you don’t have to stabilize your core to do the exercise,” according to Mike Reinold, PT, CSCS, of Champion PT and Performance in Boston.  “Strength without core stability can overload your back and lead to pain.”

Instead of machines, perform exercises in which your back is not supported, like pushups instead of chest press machine, and standing dumbbell shoulder presses instead of the shoulder press machine.  Planks are another good alternative for building core strength and stability.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Debunking 7 Muscle Myths

2 Oct

7-truths-8[1]Some of the stuff — strength and conditioning “facts” — I hear in (and out of) my facility is comical.  There are lots of anecdotal “experts;” from coaches to parents to the athletes themselves.

Here’s a nice resource from Men’s Health titled, The Truth Behind 7 Muscle Myths.

The article dispels some common misconceptions about workout duration; protein consumption; squat depth; muscle soreness; stretching and injury prevention; Swiss ball exercises; and free weights vs. machines.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Get Functionally Fit in 2015

29 Dec

bigstock-Gym-man-and-woman-push-up-stre-40734724[1]It’s New Year’s resolution time and, for some of us, that means a major overhaul of our diet and exercise plans in 2015.

For others, a few modifications to our current regimen is all we’ll need.

And, of course, there will be those of us for whom 2015 — from a fitness perspective — will be “business as usual.”

Regardless of your plan, don’t just get (or stay) fit in 2015… get functionally fit.

Functional training means challenging yourself with exercises that not only build strength, but also require balance and stability.  Avoid or minimize stationary, machine-based exercises that “lock” you into single-joint and/or isolated muscle group movements.

Free weights generally require more balance, stability, and core activation than machines and can also provide for a greater range-of-motion.  And don’t limit yourself to pushing and pulling exercises.  You can use kettlebells and medicine balls to bend, twist, turn, carry, swing, toss, and throw.

Perform more unilateral exercises — those that work one arm, one leg, or one side of the body — as an alternative to traditional bilateral exercises.  Single-leg exercise versions of the squat, Romanian deadlift, and Bulgarian split squat work the entire lower body and prevent the stronger limb from compensating for the weaker one.  The same principle applies to upper-body exercises like single-arm presses and rows.

Perform more exercises on your feet, as opposed to sitting or lying down.  Try using a suspension trainer, like the TRX, and you’ll activate your core with every exercise you do.

If you’re going to do cardio, get away from the traditional slow, steady paced jog.  Incorporate high-intensity interval training into your routine.  Add exercises and drills that require backpedaling, lateral shuffling, hopping, skipping, and lunging.

Do more movement-based training, and less muscle-based training, and you’ll look, feel, function, and perform better than ever.

Looking for some help, guidance and/or direction to get started?  Contact us today via our website.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Switch from Machines to Free Weights

22 Jan

Standing%20Dumbbell%20Shoulder%20Press[1]There’s no argument that exercise machines are mostly convenient and easy-to-use.  Hop on, set your resistance level, and go to work.

However, recent research from the University of South Carolina (excerpted in Men’s Health) revealed that men who train with free weights are less likely to have lower back pain than those who use weight-training machines.

“With machines, you don’t have to stabilize your core to do the exercise,” according to Mike Reinold, PT, CSCS, of Champion PT and Performance in Boston.  “Strength without core stability can overload your back and lead to pain.”

Instead of machines, perform exercises in which your back is not supported, like pushups instead of chest press machine, and standing dumbbell shoulder presses instead of the shoulder press machine.  Planks are another good alternative for building core strength and stability.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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