Tag Archives: fruits

Eat Protein and Produce at Every Meal

26 Apr

Whole foods are best for building muscle, because they contain vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other micro-nutrients that you don’t always get in supplements.  “If your food used to have a face or grow in the ground, it’s appropriate to eat,” says Bill Hartman, PT, CSCS.

To maximize the impact your diet has on building muscle and getting stronger, make protein and produce the centerpiece of every meal.  Grilled or blackened chicken or salmon, with a side of sautéed broccoli, make a great “go-to” meal, and can be prepared in advance.  Stick with lean protein sources, colorful fruits, and green vegetables.  When preparing your meals, avoid sauces, glazes, and dressings that pack on fat and calories.

Peanut butter (and nuts like almonds, cashews, and pistachios) and Greek yogurt are great choices, convenient, and portable.

For planning purposes, there are some fruits and vegetables that actually retain more of their flavor and nutrients frozen than fresh, including corn, peas, spinach, blueberries, and cherries.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

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Eat for Better Hydration

15 Jun

642x361-The_5_Best_Watermelon_Seed_Benefits[1]Summer is here and, although hydration is always important, it can be difficult to drink enough to stay hydrated when temperatures climb.

Fortunately, you can get plenty of fluid through your food – more specifically, fresh summer produce.

Here are a few examples of fruits and vegetables, and their water content:

  • 1 watermelon wedge = 10 ounces of water
  • 1 medium peach = 5 oz.
  • 1 cup sliced strawberries = 5 oz.
  • 1 cup sliced cucumber = 4 oz.
  • 1 medium tomato = 4 oz.
  • 1 cup chopped raw zucchini = 4 oz.
  • 1 ear cooked corn on the cob = 3 oz.

Supplement your hydration and improve your nutrition with fresh summer fruits and veggies.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

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Eat Clean, Get Lean, Feel Great

24 Apr

50-clean-eating-superfoods-[1]Eating clean isn’t about being extreme or fanatical about the foods you eat.  It’s about making better choices and realizing that moderation is the key.

Eating clean means opting for more of the foods we know are good for us — whole grains, leans meats, fruits, vegetables, and good fats (the kind that comes from nuts and seeds) — and less of the stuff we know is not so good — processed foods, sugar, sodium, and bad fats (for example, trans fats).

Here are some basic rules for eating clean:

Stick with the Basics

The closer foods are to their natural states, the better.  That means unsalted, without added sugar, grass-fed, free-range, meats, and whole fruits and vegetables.  Add more “real” food to your diet, and improve your overall health.

Beware of Boxes and Cans

Most foods that come in a box, and many that come in cans, are processed in some way.  They either add “bad” stuff or strip away “good” stuff.  As a rule, the closer a food is to its original form, the better it is for you.

Be a Label Checker

Try to spend a little time reading the ingredient lists of the foods you and your family eat.  Generally, the healthiest foods contain the fewest ingredients.  If you can’t pronounce an ingredient, don’t eat it.

Avoid Bad Ingredients

Trans fats, food coloring and dyes, artificial sweeteners, high-fructose corn syrup, and nitrates and nitrites have been linked with everything from heart attacks and strokes to tumors and certain cancers.  Steer clear of foods that contain these ingredients.

Be a Smart(er) Shopper

Foods that are low in sugar and fat, and high in fiber, are great choices as meals and snacks.  Add to your grocery list foods like hummus, tuna and salmon, whole-grain breads and pastas, chia seeds, quinoa, seasonal fruits and vegetables, and lean meats; and spices and condiments like peppercorn, canola oil, and garlic powder.

Eat at Home

It takes a little forethought, planning, and preparation, but home cooking can help you cut calories and improve nutrition.  There are lots of online resources that can provide quick, easy-to-prepare, nutritious recipes for you and your family.  Try “one-dish” meals, which contain a vegetable, protein, and complex carbohydrate.  Use a slow cooker or Crock-Pot and program the time you want your food to be ready.  Cook large, family-sized portions and freeze leftovers for meals later in the week.  Try new foods, combinations, and preparations.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Eat Protein and Produce at Every Meal

20 Dec

salmon+and+spicy+broccoli+2[1]Whole foods are best for building muscle, because they contain vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other micro-nutrients that you don’t always get in supplements.  “If your food used to have a face or grow in the ground, it’s appropriate to eat,” says Bill Hartman, PT, CSCS.

To maximize the impact your diet has on building muscle and getting stronger, make protein and produce the centerpiece of every meal.  Grilled or blackened chicken or salmon, with a side of sautéed broccoli, make a great “go-to” meal, and can be prepared in advance.  Stick with lean protein sources, colorful fruits, and green vegetables.  When preparing your meals, avoid sauces, glazes, and dressings that pack on fat and calories.

Peanut butter (and nuts like almonds, cashews, and pistachios) and Greek yogurt are great choices, convenient, and portable.

For planning purposes, there are some fruits and vegetables that actually retain more of their flavor and nutrients frozen than fresh, including corn, peas, spinach, blueberries, and cherries.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Eat Healthy: Get More Color in Your Diet

9 Nov

“Eat a rainbow of colors often.  Every meal should include colorful fruits and vegetables because of their fiber and nutrient densities.” – Core Performance founder Mark Verstegen

If you’re like most Americans, your diet is deficient in (or, sadly, devoid of) fruits and vegetables.  But your body needs these colorful foods and the benefits they provide, including improved health and wellness; immune function; and physiologic function.  Fruits and vegetables provide nutrients – vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants – to nourish your body that can’t be replicated in a supplement.  Different colored foods play different roles in the body.  Aim for at least two servings of fruit and three servings of vegetables over the course of the day.

The key is finding some fruits and vegetables you like, and incorporating them into your daily routine (think apples slices, baby carrots, etc.).  Try something new… raw, cooked, or added to other foods.  Dining out?  Hit the salad bar and create a “colorful” salad.  There are, literally, hundreds of choices… below are just a few:

RED Fruits and Vegetables

  • Health Benefits: Heart health and circulation; memory
  • Fruits: Cherries, cranberries, strawberries, apples
  • Vegetables: Tomatoes, red bell peppers, beets, radishes

ORANGE Fruits and Vegetables

  • Health Benefits: Loaded with antioxidants like vitamin C; skin and eye health; immune system
  • Fruits: Oranges, peaches, apricots, cantaloupe
  • Vegetables: Carrots, sweet potatoes, butternut squash

YELLOW Fruits and Vegetables

  • Health Benefits: Digestion, brain function
  • Fruits: Pineapple, grapefruit, pears
  • Vegetables: Yellow peppers, yellow winter squash

GREEN Fruits and Vegetables

  • Health Benefits: Muscles, bones, teeth
  • Fruits: Avocado, green apples, green grapes, kiwi
  • Vegetables: Broccoli, spinach, green beans, leafy greens

BLUE/PURPLE Fruits and Vegetables

  • Health Benefits: may have anti-aging properties and improve memory
  • Fruits: Blueberries, blackberries, plums, figs
  • Vegetables: Eggplant, purple cabbage

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

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