Tag Archives: goal attainment

Opportunity is Just the Beginning

7 Apr

Opportunity, and — more specifically — what you do with it, is the key to growth and development.  Think of it in these terms:  “Point A” represents who, what, and where you are today.  “Point B” is your aspiration, destination, or goal (who, what, and where you want to be, tomorrow).  The path between these two points represents opportunity.  Sometimes the path will be obvious.  Other times, it may not.  Regardless, your ultimate success in any endeavor will depend on how effectively you navigate this path.  Here are 4 strategies, as they relate to opportunity (with some added basketball analogies):

Look For It

Sometimes you can’t wait for opportunity to knock at your door.  You will have to open the door, walk through the doorway, and search for it.  In basketball, your defender isn’t always going to provide you with a clear path to the hoop.  Think with the end in mind.  Make sure your goal is clear and specific.  The means to your goal attainment will be more clear if you know and understand what success looks like.  Seek advice and guidance by consulting with others who have experience and expertise in your area of interest.

Recognize It

Opportunity isn’t always obvious, nor is it always in plain sight.  If you are a student of the game, your opponent’s tendencies will reveal themselves, over the course of the game.  You have to be willing to think broadly and “connect” your development plan with your goal.  Once again, it all begins with goal setting.  There may be some trial and error, along the way, but that’s okay.  Build some “checkpoints” into your plan.  This will make it easier to recognize whether or not you’re on the right track.

Take Advantage Of It

When you do find and recognize opportunity, take action… don’t procrastinate.  The window of opportunity sometimes closes very quickly.  In basketball, boxing out your opponent to get a rebound is important, but you have to go after the ball, too.

Create It

There will be times when you just have to do it yourself.  Leverage your strengths and talents.  Use the information you have gleaned from scouting your opponent, and other past experiences, and create your own opportunity.  Calculated risk-taking will be part of the equation.  As the old proverb states, “nothing ventured, nothing gained.”

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Mental Preparation is the Key

8 Feb

joey-votto-smi2[1]Every athlete knows that physical tools are important.  Strength, speed, agility, and athleticismand the commitment to the development of each — are integral to success in virtually every sport.  Factor in sport-specific skill development (for example, basketball ball-handling and shooting), and you’re on your way to building a strong foundation.

Equally important is your mind, and its ability to drive your body.  Mental preparation, focus, and confidence are all implicated in your success and attainment of your goals.  Generally, your limits will be those you set for yourself.  Here are some tips to improve performance and push through those self-imposed limitations through mental preparation.

Have a plan

I’m always surprised by athletes, especially at the higher levels, who “just play.”  That is, they don’t really have a game plan.  Situational preparation leads to successful execution.  A baseball player should go to the plate with a plan, depending on the score, inning, opposing tendencies and trends, number of outs, baserunners, pitch type and location, etc.  Having a plan — and working your plan — will help build your confidence, which fuels a positive mindset.

Stay positive

A negative attitude and focus won’t help you or your team.  When I train athletes, we don’t talk about the negative.  Sure, there will be times when you face less-than-desirable circumstances and conditions (inclement weather, an injured teammate, etc.)  Your attitude is contagious and it will impact the people around you.  Do your best to maintain positive words and body language.  Expect to win.

Be adaptable

There’s a lot you can control, but not everything.  You have to practice being adaptable, and believe you can do anything.  Train yourself to overcome obstacles, and not concede to them.  For example, a basketball point guard should anticipate the defense taking away his/her strong hand, and should practice and develop capable ball-handling skills with his/her “off” hand.

Focus on small goals

Rather than focusing on winning the game, direct your focus on each individual at-bat or offensive possession.  Your goal should be to win each inning, quarter, or period.  Successful attainment of each small goal will lead you, ultimately, to your larger goal.  Looking too far ahead to the outcome can dilute your focus.  Do your best to impact the present and the future will take care of itself.

Talk to yourself

Positive self-talk is a strong motivator.  External motivation is great, but it’s also inconsistent — you can’t always count on others to motivate you.  Find quotes, sayings, or slogans that motivate you.  Visualize yourself succeeding (and celebrating).  Learn to communicate with yourself in a way that is positive and motivating.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Your Goals Won’t Achieve Themselves

27 Feb

Man on top of mountain.Question 1: What do you want to do? Who do you want to be? Where do you want to go?

Question 2: What are you doing to make that happen?

You can’t wait and wish for something to happen.  If it’s important to you — something you really want — you’ve got to make it happen.

Don’t wait for inspiration or motivation, just get moving and take a step in the direction of your desired goal.  It may seem counter-intuitive, but action precedes motivation.

Sometimes, getting started (and staying on course) may seem a little scary, but you’ll be surprised by how much the fear and apprehension subside once you get going.  Once you take action — even the smallest step — toward your goal, you will feel empowered, energized, and motivated.

  • Focus on your dreams and goals, and don’t allow yourself to be discouraged or distracted by short-term adversity and obstacles.
  • Stay determined, even when things aren’t going as planned.
  • Take calculated risks; understand that goal achievement will require change, in some way.
  • Engage in positive self-talk, and surround yourself with positive and encouraging people.
  • Be accountable for your daily actions.

Perhaps your goal requires some assistance along the way.  There are lots of willing and qualified people who can get you started and provide guidance on your journey.  No matter what your goal, identify and acquire the resources you need — equipment, education, assistance, or apparel — to achieve it.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Opportunity is Just the Beginning

6 Dec

Opportunity[1]Opportunity, and — more specifically — what you do with it, is the key to growth and development.  Think of it in these terms:  “Point A” represents who, what, and where you are today.  “Point B” is your aspiration, destination, or goal (who, what, and where you want to be, tomorrow).  The path between these two points represents opportunity.  Sometimes the path will be obvious.  Other times, it may not.  Regardless, your ultimate success in any endeavor will depend on how effectively you navigate this path.  Here are 4 strategies, as they relate to opportunity (with some added basketball analogies):

Look For It

Sometimes you can’t wait for opportunity to knock at your door.  You will have to open the door, walk through the doorway, and search for it.  In basketball, your defender isn’t always going to provide you with a clear path to the hoop.  Think with the end in mind.  Make sure your goal is clear and specific.  The means to your goal attainment will be more clear if you know and understand what success looks like.  Seek advice and guidance by consulting with others who have experience and expertise in your area of interest.

Recognize It

Opportunity isn’t always obvious, nor is it always in plain sight.  If you are a student of the game, your opponent’s tendencies will reveal themselves, over the course of the game.  You have to be willing to think broadly and “connect” your development plan with your goal.  Once again, it all begins with goal setting.  There may be some trial and error, along the way, but that’s okay.  Build some “checkpoints” into your plan.  This will make it easier to recognize whether or not you’re on the right track.

Take Advantage Of It

When you do find and recognize opportunity, take action… don’t procrastinate.  The window of opportunity sometimes closes very quickly.  In basketball, boxing out your opponent to get a rebound is important, but you have to go after the ball, too.

Create It

There will be times when you just have to do it yourself.  Leverage your strengths and talents.  Use the information you have gleaned from scouting your opponent, and other past experiences, and create your own opportunity.  Calculated risk-taking will be part of the equation.  As the old proverb states, “nothing ventured, nothing gained.”

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Mental Preparation is the Key

25 Oct

joey-votto-smi2[1]Every athlete knows that physical tools are important.  Strength, speed, agility, and athleticismand the commitment to the development of each — are integral to success in virtually every sport.  Factor in sport-specific skill development (for example, basketball ball-handling and shooting), and you’re on your way to building a strong foundation.

Equally important is your mind, and its ability to drive your body.  Mental preparation, focus, and confidence are all implicated in your success and attainment of your goals.  Generally, your limits will be those you set for yourself.  Here are some tips to improve performance and push through those self-imposed limitations through mental preparation.

Have a plan

I’m always surprised by athletes, especially at the higher levels, who “just play.”  That is, they don’t really have a game plan.  Situational preparation leads to successful execution.  A baseball player should go to the plate with a plan, depending on the score, inning, opposing tendencies and trends, number of outs, baserunners, pitch type and location, etc.  Having a plan — and working your plan — will help build your confidence, which fuels a positive mindset.

Stay positive

A negative attitude and focus won’t help you or your team.  When I train athletes, we don’t talk about the negative.  Sure, there will be times when you face less-than-desirable circumstances and conditions (inclement weather, an injured teammate, etc.)  Your attitude is contagious and it will impact the people around you.  Do your best to maintain positive words and body language.  Expect to win.

Be adaptable

There’s a lot you can control, but not everything.  You have to practice being adaptable, and believe you can do anything.  Train yourself to overcome obstacles, and not concede to them.  For example, a basketball point guard should anticipate the defense taking away his/her strong hand, and should practice and develop capable ball-handling skills with his/her “off” hand.

Focus on small goals

Rather than focusing on winning the game, direct your focus on each individual at-bat or offensive possession.  Your goal should be to win each inning, quarter, or period.  Successful attainment of each small goal will lead you, ultimately, to your larger goal.  Looking too far ahead to the outcome can dilute your focus.  Do your best to impact the present and the future will take care of itself.

Talk to yourself

Positive self-talk is a strong motivator.  External motivation is great, but it’s also inconsistent — you can’t always count on others to motivate you.  Find quotes, sayings, or slogans that motivate you.  Visualize yourself succeeding (and celebrating).  Learn to communicate with yourself in a way that is positive and motivating.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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