Tag Archives: hustle

The 3 H’s for Athletes

17 Jun

hire_an_athelete-header-1024x588[1]

There are lots of qualities and characteristics that are important elements of athletic performance and achievement.  Ability, skill, and talent are — obviously — what every athlete aspires to develop.

But there are also intangible — effort-related — attributes that can improve any athlete’s performance.  Every team needs these athletes.  Persistent kids who work hard to get the most out of their talents and abilities.

Here are three of those attributes that will make any athlete hard to beat.

The 3 H’s for Athletes:

  1. Hard Work.  Get in the weight room.  Improve your strength, speed, agility, and athleticism.  Practice your sport-specific skills.  Improve your ball-handling, hitting, skating, foot skills, or whatever your sport requires.  Have a plan and work smart.
  2. Heart.  Believe in yourself.  Play with aggressiveness, confidence, and energy.  Hard work begets confidence.  Be confident, but not cocky.  Be positive, and have a “can-do” attitude.  Expect to succeed every time you’re on the field or court.
  3. Hustle.  It doesn’t matter whether or not you’re the most talented player on the field or court.  Never allow yourself to be out-worked.  Whatever your 100% looks like, give it.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

How to be a Better Basketball Defender

6 Jun

Basketball-Pressure-Defense[1]I’ve heard it said that offense wins games, but defense wins championships.  Your shots may or may not be falling, on any given day, but defense shouldn’t be susceptible to slumps.  And while you have to score to win, I can tell you this with certainty:  If you can make it difficult for your opponent’s offense to operate and score, and limit their opportunities, you’ll always be in the game.

Defense may not be as glamorous as scoring lots of points, but there’s nothing more important — and gratifying — than being a “shut-down” defender.  Here are some basketball defensive tips to help you become a better defender:

Keep your balance. Maintain a low, athletic stance with a wide base (don’t let your feet get too close together or crossed).  Your weight should be over your mid-foot — avoid being back on your heels.  Stay on your feet… don’t go for shot fakes.

Move your feet.  Don’t reach or lean.  Playing defense with your hands invites foul calls against you.  Anticipate the offensive player’s move and beat them to the spot.

Watch your opponent’s chest, and not their head, feet, or the ball.  They can try to deceive you with a jab step or ball fake, but their chest will always tell you where they are going.

Get a hand in your opponent’s face.  Distract them from focusing on their shot or pass.

“Force” them where you want them to go.  Understand your defensive strategy and where your help is coming from.  As a rule, position yourself between the person you’re guarding and the basket, especially on the perimeter.  Take away your opponent’s dominant hand.  Most players can’t use both hands equally, so you usually want to force them to go to the hand they don’t want to. Overplay their strong hand to make them use their weak hand.

See the person you’re guarding and the ball, at all times.  Position yourself appropriately.  Be ready to help.

Observe your opponent’s patterns and trends.  Learn and understand what they like to do — their “go-to” moves — in certain situations.

No open looks or layups.  Actively defend every dribble, pass, and shot.

Communicate with your teammates.  Always talk on defense.  Call out screens and switches.  Basketball defense is played as a team.

Box out and rebound.  Limit your opponent’s second chances.

Hustle at all times.  Defense is about effort.  You’ve got to give 100% effort when you’re on the court.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Don’t Confuse Motion and Progress

11 Apr

tumblr_m1bwfq9uOV1qi2f8bo1_500[1]“Do not confuse motion and progress. A rocking horse keeps moving but does not make any progress.” – Alfred A. Montapert

“Don’t mistake activity for achievement.” – John Wooden

Some players — and coaches — are enamored with “hustle” — bodies flying all over the court or field with reckless abandon.  To some, it looks like a lot of effort is being expended.  Unfortunately, as I observe scholastic sports, much of this activity lacks purpose… there’s no rhyme or reason to it.  Some of it is nothing more than a lot of frenetic energy that, ultimately, doesn’t accomplish much.

Whether you’re practicing, playing, or training… have a goal.  Understand what it is you want (need) to accomplish and what is required of you to achieve the desired result.  Think situationally about the “why,” “what,” and “how.”  Your practice, game-play, and training should be purposeful.

For example, when you practice ball-handling and shooting, don’t just randomly dribble and throw the ball at the basket.  Work on your “off” hand, and practice moves that help you create your own shot (hesitation, step-back, etc.).

When you take batting practice, don’t just swing the bat to make contact.  Practice bunting, hitting behind the runner, hitting to the opposite field, and hitting the ball in the air (sac fly).

When you train, don’t just do random exercises.  Perform exercises and drills that are aligned with your goals, and reflect the demands and movement patterns of your sport(s) — whether they be strength, speed, power, agility, etc.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

The 3 H’s for Athletes

7 Nov

hire_an_athelete-header-1024x588[1]

There are lots of qualities and characteristics that are important elements of athletic performance and achievement.  Ability, skill, and talent are, obviously, what every athlete aspires to develop.

But there are also intangible — effort-related — attributes that can improve any athlete’s performance.  Every team needs these athletes.  Persistent kids who work hard to get the most out of their talents and abilities.

Here are three of those attributes that will make any athlete hard to beat.

The 3 H’s for Athletes:

  1. Hard Work.  Get in the weight room.  Improve your strength, speed, agility, and athleticism.  Practice your sport-specific skills.  Improve your ball-handling, hitting, skating, foot skills, or whatever your sport requires.  Have a plan and work smart.
  2. Heart.  Believe in yourself.  Play with aggressiveness, confidence, and energy.  Hard work begets confidence.  Be confident, but not cocky.  Be positive, and have a “can-do” attitude.  Expect to succeed every time you’re on the field or court.
  3. Hustle.  It doesn’t matter whether or not you’re the most talented player on the field or court.  Never allow yourself to be out-worked.  Whatever your 100% looks like, give it.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

How to be a Better Basketball Defender

29 Apr

Basketball-Pressure-Defense[1]I’ve heard it said that offense wins games, but defense wins championships.  Your shots may or may not be falling, on any given day, but defense shouldn’t be susceptible to slumps.  And while you have to score to win, I can tell you this with certainty:  If you can make it difficult for your opponent’s offense to operate and score, you’ll always be in the game.

Defense may not be as glamorous as scoring lots of points, but there’s nothing more important — and gratifying — than being a “shut-down” defender.  Here are some basketball defensive tips to help you become a better defender:

Keep your balance. Maintain a low, athletic stance with a wide base (don’t let your feet get too close together or crossed).  Your weight should be over your mid-foot — avoid being back on your heels.  Stay on your feet… don’t go for shot fakes.

Move your feet.  Don’t reach or lean.  Playing defense with your hands invites foul calls against you.  Anticipate the offensive player’s move and beat them to the spot.

Watch your opponent’s chest, and not their head, feet, or the ball.  They can try to deceive you with a jab step or ball fake, but their chest will always tell you where they are going.

Get a hand in your opponent’s face.  Distract them from focusing on their shot or pass.

“Force” them where you want them to go.  Understand your defensive strategy and where your help is coming from.  As a rule, position yourself between the person you’re guarding and the basket, especially on the perimeter.  Take away your opponent’s dominant hand.  Most players can’t use both hands equally, so you usually want to force them to go to the hand they don’t want to. Overplay their strong hand to make them use their weak hand.

See the person you’re guarding and the ball, at all times.  Position yourself appropriately.  Be ready to help.

Observe your opponent’s patterns and trends.  Learn and understand what they like to do — their “go-to” moves — in certain situations.

No open looks or layups.  Actively defend every dribble, pass, and shot.

Communicate with your teammates.  Always talk on defense.  Call out screens and switches.  Basketball defense is played as a team.

Box out and rebound.  Limit your opponent’s second chances.

Hustle at all times.  Defense is about effort.  You’ve got to give 100% effort when you’re on the court.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Don’t Confuse Motion and Progress

18 Mar

tumblr_m1bwfq9uOV1qi2f8bo1_500[1]“Do not confuse motion and progress. A rocking horse keeps moving but does not make any progress.” – Alfred A. Montapert

“Don’t mistake activity for achievement.” – John Wooden

Some players — and coaches — are enamored with “hustle” — bodies flying all over the court or field with reckless abandon.  To some, it looks like a lot of effort is being expended.  Unfortunately, as I observe scholastic sports, much of this activity lacks purpose… there’s no rhyme or reason to it.  Some of it is nothing more than a lot of frenetic energy that, ultimately, doesn’t accomplish much.

Whether you’re practicing, playing, or training… have a goal.  Understand what it is you want (need) to accomplish and what is required of you to achieve the desired result.  Think situationally about the “why,” “what,” and “how.”  Your practice, game-play, and training should be purposeful.

For example, when you practice ball-handling and shooting, don’t just randomly dribble and throw the ball at the basket.  Work on your “off” hand, and practice moves that help you create your own shot (hesitation, step-back, etc.).

When you take batting practice, don’t just swing the bat to make contact.  Practice bunting, hitting behind the runner, hitting to the opposite field, and hitting the ball in the air (sac fly).

When you train, don’t just do random exercises.  Perform exercises and drills that are aligned with your goals — whether they be strength, speed, power, agility, etc.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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