Tag Archives: jump rope

Improve Your Speed and Agility with Jump Training

20 Apr

Lead%20Photo-1[1]Research has shown a definitive correlation between jumping ability and running performance, including speed and agility.  Generally, there is a stronger correlation based on the sprint distance.  The contribution of muscle power may be most important in shorter distance sprints (for example, 60, 100, and 200 meters), although middle- and long-distance running performance is positively impacted, as well.  Development of muscle power — via jump training — should be considered as  a component for training for most sports, including both sprinters and middle- and long-distance runners.

Running velocity, including the ability to accelerate, decelerate, and change direction quickly, has been shown to be a function of force and power production.  The high-power output associated with jumping activities has led researchers to determine that jumping tests could be used as a  predictor of running performance.

Force and power are obvious components of running ability.  Maximal squat strength has been significantly correlated to sprint performance.  So, how do you incorporate strength and power training — including jump training — into your strength and conditioning regimen in a relevant way?

Strength Training

Before you start jump training, including plyometrics, you’ve got to be strong.  In order to be safe and effective, high-intensity power training requires adequate strength.  Bilateral, lower-body strength exercises like the squat, deadlift, and Romanian deadlift will help you build a strong foundation.  Unilateral exercises like the stepup and Bulgarian split squat are more functional, requiring strength and stability

Jump Training

Plyometrics are the most effective way to build lower-extremity power.  These exercises, done correctly, are designed to help you generate the greatest possible force in the shortest amount of time.  Jumping rope and jumping jacks are basic plyometric exercises, and a good place to start.  Once proficient at these exercises, you can progress to multiple, continuous box and hurdle jumps.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Summer Fitness Made Easy

26 Jun

0803-summer-fitness_vg[1]Summer is a great time of year (the best, in my opinion), because it’s easy to improve your fitness without making wholesale changes to your routine.  Here are some tips for an active, healthy  — and fit — summer:

  • Get outside.  Walk. Run. Bike. Hike. Enjoy the warm weather. When it gets too hot, take advantage of the early morning and evening hours, when temperatures are more reasonable.
  • Be efficient in the gym. Get in; get your work done; get out.
  • Sleep in on the weekend. It can be difficult to get 7-8 hours every night during the week. Use the weekend to get a full, restorative night of sleep.
  • Eliminate excuses. Can’t get to the gym? Workout at home. Don’t have a lot of time? 10 minutes of concentrated activity is better than none at all.
  • Try a warm weather activity. Find something you enjoy and do more of it while the weather allows.
  • Workout with a friend. You’re more likely to stay on task with a partner.
  • Make more stops at roadside stands for fresh fruits and delicious summer vegetables.
  • Try a new stretch. Use a stretch band (rope or towel) to gently assist in pulling a muscle a little farther than your body would ordinarily allow.
  • Challenge yourself. Gradually and progressively increase the intensity of your workout — weight, reps, sets, reduced rest intervals, etc.
  • Set goals. A combination of short- and long-term goals is important to your success. An end-of-summer (or mid-summer) goal sets your motivation in motion and helps define direction and purpose.
  • Create a summer playlist. A new playlist can boost your motivation when you’re starting a new exercise routine. Keeping your music fresh can help keep your training fun.
  • Beat the heat. Stay hydrated, take frequent water breaks, and avoid midday workouts.
  • Pack a jump rope for your summer vacation.
  • Don’t overdo it. Take some time to recover and regenerate.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Improve Your Speed and Agility with Jump Training

27 Mar

Lead%20Photo-1[1]Research has shown a definitive correlation between jumping ability and running performance, including speed and agility.  Generally, there is a stronger correlation based on the sprint distance.  The contribution of muscle power may be most important in shorter distance sprints (for example, 60, 100, and 200 meters), although middle- and long-distance running performance is positively impacted, as well.  Development of muscle power — via jump training — should be considered as  a component for training for most sports, including both sprinters and middle- and long-distance runners.

Running velocity, including the ability to accelerate, decelerate, and change direction quickly, has been shown to be a function of force and power production.  The high-power output associated with jumping activities has led researchers to determine that jumping tests could be used as a  predictor of running performance.

Force and power are obvious components of running ability.  Maximal squat strength has been significantly correlated to sprint performance.  So, how do you incorporate strength and power training — including jump training — into your strength and conditioning regimen in a relevant way?

Strength Training

Before you start jump training, including plyometrics, you’ve got to be strong.  In order to be safe and effective, high-intensity power training requires adequate strength.  Bilateral, lower-body strength exercises like the squat, deadlift, and Romanian deadlift will help you build a strong foundation.  Unilateral exercises like the stepup and Bulgarian split squat are more functional, requiring strength and stability

Jump Training

Plyometrics are the most effective way to build lower-extremity power.  These exercises, done correctly, are designed to help you generate the greatest possible force in the shortest amount of time.  Jumping rope and jumping jacks are basic plyometric exercises, and a good place to start.  Once proficient at these exercises, you can progress to multiple, continuous box and hurdle jumps.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Add the Jump Rope to Your Training Routine

30 Jan

32864[1]Jumping rope tends to be an overlooked exercise (admittedly, I have several jump ropes at my facility that are usually underused).  Maybe it’s because we still think of it as something children do on a playground, but this portable, low-tech piece of exercise equipment could (should?) be part of your exercise routine.  Here are some reasons to incorporate jumping rope into your training regimen:

  • Requires very little space
  • Cost is minimal
  • Virtually no equipment needed — a jump rope and supportive athletic shoes
  • Helps development of agility, coordination, and balance
  • Can burn more calories than running, in the same amount of time
  • Helps improve cardiovascular and muscular endurance
  • Total-body exercise
  • Reinforces good posture
  • Can be part of a healthy, weight-loss strategy
  • Helps maintain healthy bones
  • Plyometric exercise is great for athletes (“teaches” your body to generate force quickly)
  • Can be used as a warmup activity

Try this simple (but challenging) 8-minute jump rope workout:  Jump for 50 seconds, followed by a 10-second rest interval.  Repeat seven more times, until you’ve completed 8 minutes — 50 seconds “on,” and 10 seconds “off.”

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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