Tag Archives: milk

Whey is the Way to Go

29 Mar

When it comes to protein, athletes have lots of different options.  There’s protein from whole foods, like milk protein, egg protein, meat protein, and plant protein.  As a supplement, whey protein, casein protein, and soy protein are among the alternatives.

Additionally, research shows that different types of protein work better at different times of day (and night).

In the morning, whey protein from whole foods (milk, Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, etc.) or a whey protein powder shake can help control cravings all day, according to scientists at the Journal of Nutrition.

Whey is also a good choice for your pre- and post-workout protein because it is quickly and easily digestible.

Another option for your post-workout protein is casein.  Casein is the main protein found in milk and cheese.  Of the true proteins found in milk, about 80% is casein.  The other major protein in milk is whey.  Compared to whey, casein burns more slowly and provides a consistent flow of protein, over time (sort of like a “long-acting” protein).

There are several protein powder supplements that contain both whey and casein proteins (I know of at least one that also contains egg protein).

Studies also show that casein protein, when taken before bed, can increase muscle growth by about 20%.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Increase Your Vitamin D Intake

20 Mar

A lack of vitamin D can have an adverse effect on your athletic performance, according to the journal, Nutrients.  Additional research corroborates these findings, showing that there is  a positive correlation between vitamin D levels and muscle strength.

According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), at least 77% of Americans are vitamin D deficient.  This is especially true in the northern states, where exposure to sunshine can be scarce during the winter season (the sun plays a vital role in your body’s natural vitamin D production).

You can boost your vitamin D by increasing your consumption of whole foods like fatty fish (mackerel, salmon, and tuna), milk (and other fortified dairy products), eggs, and oatmeal (and other fortified cereals).

You can also improve your vitamin D level by adding a supplement to your daily diet.  Aim for at least 600 IU per day.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Drink Real Milk

28 Sep

milk-cow1GET REAL! That’s the advice from Men’s Health, when it comes to the milk you drink.

Not all non-dairy milks – milk alternatives – have the same nutrients as real milk, so it’s important to know how they compare.

Cow’s milk has 8 grams of protein and 12 grams of sugar per glass.  But that natural milk sugar (lactose) is absorbed more slowly than added sugar.

Sweetened almond milk (with water as its main ingredient) has 7 grams of sugar, zero lactose, ans 1 measly gram of protein.  That means you would have to drink 64 ounces of almond milk to get the same protein provided by just one glass of milk.  Hope you’re thirsty…

Check your ingredient labels. Real milk is remarkably simple — milk, typically with added vitamin A and D, so you always know what you get when you pour a glass. Other non-dairy milk options often have more than 10 ingredients, including added salt and sugar, and stabilizers and emulsifiers like locust bean gum, sunflower lecithin and gellan gum.

Non-dairy milk producers, like almond milk and rice milk, use different methods to fortify their products and there is no federal standard for these products on which nutrients they add or how much. All dairy milk provides the same nine essential nutrients, including high-quality protein, so unlike other non-dairy milks, you always know what you’ll get when you grab a glass of milk.

There’s just no substitute for milk. It’s naturally nutrient-rich like no other beverage.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

You thoughts?

Whey is the Way to Go

29 Nov

optimum-nutrition-casein-protein[1]When it comes to protein, athletes have lots of different options.  There’s protein from whole foods, like milk protein, egg protein, meat protein, and plant protein.  As a supplement, whey protein, casein protein, and soy protein are among the alternatives.

Additionally, research shows that different types of protein work better at different times of day (and night).

In the morning, whey protein from whole foods (milk, Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, etc.) or a whey protein powder shake can help control cravings all day, according to scientists at the Journal of Nutrition.

Whey is also a good choice for your pre- and post-workout protein because it is quickly and easily digestible.

Another option for your post-workout protein is casein.  Casein is the main protein found in milk and cheese.  Of the true proteins found in milk, about 80% is casein.  The other major protein in milk is whey.  Compared to whey, casein burns more slowly and provides a consistent flow of protein, over time (sort of like a “long-acting” protein).

There are several protein powder supplements that contain both whey and casein proteins (I know of at least one that also contains egg protein).

Studies also show that casein protein, when taken before bed, can increase muscle growth by about 20%.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Increase Your Vitamin D Intake

20 Nov

Foods+high+in+Vitamin+B6[1]A lack of vitamin D can have an adverse effect on your athletic performance, according to the journal, Nutrients.  Additional research corroborates these findings, showing that there is  a positive correlation between vitamin D levels and muscle strength.

According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), at least 77% of Americans are vitamin D deficient.  This is especially true in the northern states, where exposure to sunshine can be scarce during the winter season (the sun plays a vital role in your body’s natural vitamin D production).

You can boost your vitamin D by increasing your consumption of whole foods like fatty fish (mackerel, salmon, and tuna), milk (and other fortified dairy products), eggs, and oatmeal (and other fortified cereals).

You can also improve your vitamin D level by adding a supplement to your daily diet.  Aim for 600 IU per day.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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