Tag Archives: motivation

4 Keys to Success in the Weight Room

2 Nov

Want to improve your athletic performance?  Practice your sport-specific skills, eat right, and get in the weight room (see 3 Pillars of Athletic Performance).  Developing your strength, speed, agility, and athleticism can help you create a competitive advantage.  Get STRONGER, Get FASTER isn’t just a tag line; it’s a requisite component of your preparation for your sport(s) of choice.

Don’t waste time in the weight room.  As the saying goes, “plan your work and work your plan.”  Be productive, challenge yourself, and strive for quality and efficiency.  Follow these 4 keys to achieve success in the weight room:

Accountability

It’s on you.  You are responsible for your development.  No one can do it for you.  What you achieve (or fail to achieve) is largely a matter of choice.  Showing up is half the battle.  Get in, do work, get out, repeat.

Discipline

Your actions should be consistent with your goals.  Consistency is the key.  Do what needs to be done, as well as it can be done, and do it that way consistently.

Competitiveness

It’s you vs. you.  There’s no need to compare yourself with anyone else.  Be internally competitive.  Strive to be 1% better today than you were yesterday.  Same goes for tomorrow.  The results, over time, will be impressive.

Motivation

Refer to your goals frequently.  Reflect upon your inspiration.  Think about why you’re doing what you’re doing every time you train.  Dedication.  Determination.  Desire.  You gotta want it.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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Sports Psychology, Part 3: Motivation

19 Sep

Motivation is an important component of athletic performance.  Intrinsic motivation has a profound impact on the athlete’s desire to train and compete.  Achievement motivation relates to the athlete’s competitiveness; his or her desire to engage in competition.  Positive and negative reinforcement in coaching can have a considerable influence on an athlete’s motivation.

Intrinsic motivation is important for any athlete.  The athlete who is intrinsically motivated is self-motivated because he or she loves the game.  Coaching team sports can be much more effective when athletes are self-motivated.

Achievement motivation is fueled by an athlete’s competitiveness.  All things being equal between two athletes, the one with greater achievement motivation will be the better athlete because of his or her “appetite” for competition.

Positive reinforcement involves the use of rewards – praise, helmet decals, prizes, and awards – to increase the probability that a particular behavior will be repeated.

Negative reinforcement also increases the probability that a behavior will be repeated, by removing an event that is perceived to be unappealing or undesirable.  For example, if a team has a productive practice, the coach could announce that no sprints will be run at the end of the session.

Positive punishment describes an action that is presented after a behavior, that could decrease the behavior’s recurrence.  Reprimanding a basketball player after a turnover is an example of positive punishment.

Negative punishment is the removal of something valued.  Loss of privileges or playing time (benching) are examples of negative punishment.

Coaches should generally subscribe to a reinforcement strategy that helps athletes to focus on what they do correctly.  Punishment should be used sparingly because it emphasizes what the athlete is doing wrong, thus focusing his or her attention on incorrect behavior.  Overall, positive reinforcement helps athletes focus on task-relevant cues, while punishment can overload the athlete’s focus with task-irrelevant cues.

Your thoughts?

Next: Psychological Management Strategies

Welcome to My Blog

1 Aug

Well, after much thought and discussion (and some prodding), I’ve decided to start a blog.  I plan to share evidence-based, Strength and Conditioning information to help others reach their goals.  The information I share won’t necessarily be the “best” way, the “only” way, or the “right” way; but it will be supported by credible, reputable data from the field of Exercise Science and Physiology.  My blog will focus on (but not be limited to) Strength and Fitness; Speed and Agility; Diet and Nutrition; and I’ll also incorporate some Inspiration and Motivation.  Ultimately, I hope my passion, enthusiasm, experience, and expertise can benefit others to improve athletic performance, fitness, and/or nutrition.  You can follow my blog by clicking on the “Follow” button, and each new post will be sent directly to your email address.  You can also follow me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please let me know what you think… I welcome your comments.  Thanks!

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

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