Tag Archives: muscle growth

How Protein Becomes Muscle

29 Sep

Protein consumption, following a workout, is an important component of the muscle and strength building process.  But how, exactly, does the process work?

Here’s a terrific resource from Men’s Health titled, How Protein Becomes Muscle.  This animated video explains the process from ingestion through each subsequent stage — transportresponserepair and growth; and construction.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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Does Postexercise Muscle Soreness Indicate Training Effectiveness?

30 Jan

How%20to%20prevent%20this%20post-workout%20pain[1]Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is a common side effect of exercise, especially with unfamiliar, vigorous, high-intensity training.  Many athletes consider DOMS to be a valid indicator of training quality and effectiveness.

DOMS is probably caused by inflammation resulting from micro-tears in muscle and connective tissue that occur during exercise.  Usually, soreness begins about 6-8 hours after exercise, and can last 2-3 days.  There is no significant documentation supporting a gender-related difference in DOMS.

Since we know that these micro-tears are the stimulus for muscle growth — provided adequate time for rest, recovery, and regeneration — there is probably some theoretical basis to support such damage resulting in subsequent muscle growth.

Although postexercise soreness (stiffness) may be a valid indicator of  — and stimulus for — muscle growth, it is important to differentiate between DOMS and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD)Sharp muscle and/or joint pain may be an indicator of a more serious problem, especially if it is accompanied by considerable edema and swelling, and persists for more than a few days.

Challenge yourself in the weight room (court, field, track, etc.), but your workout should be gradually (and realistically) progressive.  Keep your increases in intensity incremental, consistent, and steady.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Build Muscle with Burnout Sets

6 Jul

opener-moves-every-man-should-master-ss[1]Lifting heavy is a great way to build muscle, but it’s not the only way.

“Men who performed low-weight, high-rep sets gained as much muscle as those who went heavy,” according to a study from the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

“High-rep training may stress muscle fibers differently, spurring greater growth.”

Don’t abandon your high-weight, low-rep workouts, altogether, just vary your approach from time to time.

When you lift heavy, perform sets with a load that challenge you for 4-6 repetitions.  This strategy will not only help you build muscle, it’s also great for developing strength and power.

On your lighter days, work with a load that allows you do perform 20 or more reps, to maximize muscle growth.

One caveat to burnout sets:  They may not be the best strategy for athletic performance training.  Athletic performance training should be more about task specificity and less about how much, how many, or for how long.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Fuel Your Body After Your Workout

22 Dec

pGNC1-13512491dt[1]Your muscles do not grow during exercise, regardless of the intensity of your workout.  Exercise is important, but it’s only the stimulus — or trigger — for growth.

You’ve got to rest and refuel your body, following a workout, in order to strengthen your muscles, and post-workout nutrition is essential for growth.

When you eat protein after your workout, your body breaks it down into amino acids, which are used to repair and rebuild muscle fibers, a process known as protein synthesis.  One amino acid, in particular, warrants special mention.

Leucine is a natural amino acid that is found in your body. Leucine and the branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine and valine, make up almost one-third of your muscle protein. Simply stated, leucine triggers muscle growth.  Leucine breaks down faster than other amino acids, and works to stimulate the production of protein and energy molecules in your muscles.  For this reason, synthetic leucine is often used as a food supplement to help athletes rebuild muscle and increase their physical endurance and strength.

When you’re buying a protein supplement, check the label to make sure it has a full complement of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs).

Aim for 30 grams of protein per meal, including post-workout.  As long as you’re eating enough calories overall, you’ll get enough leucine to optimize muscle growth.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

How Protein Becomes Muscle

30 Apr

proteinProtein consumption, following a workout, is an important component of the muscle and strength building process.  But how, exactly, does the process work?

Here’s a terrific resource from Men’s Health titled, How Protein Becomes Muscle.  This animated video explains the process from ingestion through each subsequent stage — transport; response; repair and growth; and construction.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Does Postexercise Muscle Soreness Indicate Training Effectiveness?

14 Oct

How%20to%20prevent%20this%20post-workout%20pain[1]Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is a common side effect of exercise, especially with unfamiliar, vigorous, high-intensity training.  Many athletes consider DOMS to be a valid indicator of training quality and effectiveness.

DOMS is probably caused by inflammation resulting from micro-tears in muscle and connective tissue that occur during exercise.  Usually, soreness begins about 6-8 hours after exercise, and can last 2-3 days.  There is no significant documentation supporting a gender-related difference in DOMS.

Since we know that these micro-tears are the stimulus for muscle growth — provided adequate time for rest, recovery, and regeneration — there is probably some theoretical basis to support such damage resulting in subsequent muscle growth.

Although postexercise soreness (stiffness) may be a valid indicator of  — and stimulus for — muscle growth, it is important to differentiate between DOMS and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD)Sharp muscle and/or joint pain may be an indicator of a more serious problem, especially if it is accompanied by considerable edema and swelling, and persists for more than a few days.

Challenge yourself in the weight room (court, field, track, etc.), but your workout should be gradually (and realistically) progressive.  Keep your increases in intensity incremental, consistent, and steady.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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