Tag Archives: muscle pain

Are You Overtraining?

1 Oct

A well-designed, periodized Strength & Conditioning program directs training strategies and recovery activities throughout the athlete’s off-season, pre-season, and in-season phases, to optimize performance and minimize fatigue.

But training doesn’t exist in a vacuum, and athletes often have to balance other factors, such as school-based team training/workouts, open gyms, etc. (not to mention family obligations, homework, studying, and part-time jobs)

Currently, my high school boys and girls basketball players train with me 2-3 days a week.  They are also expected to participate in “voluntary” team-based Strength & Conditioning activity at their schools (a discussion for another day) – usually 2 days a week – and 2-day-a-week open gym workouts.

So how much is enough and how much is too much?

Here’s a resource – An Overtraining Scale – from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Strength and Conditioning Journal that provides some insight into the subject of overtraining.

 

It’s important to understand that you shouldn’t “pre-determine” your training activity, relative to time off training.  For example, don’t make a decision to skip your Saturday workout just because you have a practice scheduled for Friday, without knowing how you’re going to feel Friday or Saturday.  This is where mental discipline becomes important.

Also understand that you’re going to have to work hard to achieve your goals.  You’re going to have to (reasonably) work through some fatigue – both mental and physical.  That’s how champions are made.  If it was easy, everyone would do it.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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Does Postexercise Muscle Soreness Indicate Training Effectiveness?

30 Jan

How%20to%20prevent%20this%20post-workout%20pain[1]Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is a common side effect of exercise, especially with unfamiliar, vigorous, high-intensity training.  Many athletes consider DOMS to be a valid indicator of training quality and effectiveness.

DOMS is probably caused by inflammation resulting from micro-tears in muscle and connective tissue that occur during exercise.  Usually, soreness begins about 6-8 hours after exercise, and can last 2-3 days.  There is no significant documentation supporting a gender-related difference in DOMS.

Since we know that these micro-tears are the stimulus for muscle growth — provided adequate time for rest, recovery, and regeneration — there is probably some theoretical basis to support such damage resulting in subsequent muscle growth.

Although postexercise soreness (stiffness) may be a valid indicator of  — and stimulus for — muscle growth, it is important to differentiate between DOMS and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD)Sharp muscle and/or joint pain may be an indicator of a more serious problem, especially if it is accompanied by considerable edema and swelling, and persists for more than a few days.

Challenge yourself in the weight room (court, field, track, etc.), but your workout should be gradually (and realistically) progressive.  Keep your increases in intensity incremental, consistent, and steady.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Does Postexercise Muscle Soreness Indicate Training Effectiveness?

14 Oct

How%20to%20prevent%20this%20post-workout%20pain[1]Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is a common side effect of exercise, especially with unfamiliar, vigorous, high-intensity training.  Many athletes consider DOMS to be a valid indicator of training quality and effectiveness.

DOMS is probably caused by inflammation resulting from micro-tears in muscle and connective tissue that occur during exercise.  Usually, soreness begins about 6-8 hours after exercise, and can last 2-3 days.  There is no significant documentation supporting a gender-related difference in DOMS.

Since we know that these micro-tears are the stimulus for muscle growth — provided adequate time for rest, recovery, and regeneration — there is probably some theoretical basis to support such damage resulting in subsequent muscle growth.

Although postexercise soreness (stiffness) may be a valid indicator of  — and stimulus for — muscle growth, it is important to differentiate between DOMS and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD)Sharp muscle and/or joint pain may be an indicator of a more serious problem, especially if it is accompanied by considerable edema and swelling, and persists for more than a few days.

Challenge yourself in the weight room (court, field, track, etc.), but your workout should be gradually (and realistically) progressive.  Keep your increases in intensity incremental, consistent, and steady.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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