Tag Archives: shoulder muscles

Is the Upright Row Exercise Dangerous?

24 Apr

The upright row exercise (pictured) is popular with bodybuilders, athletes, and general fitness enthusiasts.  It is usually performed to increase upper-back and shoulder muscle size.  The upright row also tends to increase neck girth, making it especially popular with football and rugby players.

Although it is a common strength training exercise, the upright row is not particularly functional, from an athletic performance (movement) training perspective.  Additionally, there are concerns about the short- and long-term safety of this exercise.

The problem occurs when you raise your arms and add resistance in that position.  Every time you raise the weight, a small tendon in your shoulder gets pinched (known as impingement) by the bones in the shoulder.  This  may not hurt immediately.   It may not even hurt for a long time.  The problem is, the tendon can gradually become worn down and damaged.  You may not even know you have a developing problem until serious injury occurs.

The upright row involves considerable medial or internal shoulder rotation. This action creates significant torque within your shoulder joints. This torque, in turn, places a potentially injurious load on the small muscles that control the stability of your shoulder joint, specifically your rotator cuff. Some exercisers find that upright rows place their shoulders in a mechanically disadvantageous position that can result in shoulder pain.

Use a wider grip and limit the range of motion of the upright row exercise by not lifting your upper arms past parallel to the floor, since this increases your risk of shoulder impingement and injury.  If you find upright rows hurt your shoulders, perform lat raises or shrugs for your trapezius muscles instead.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Advertisements

Strengthen Your Glutes to Avoid Injury

25 Nov

brewkendall_fullsize_story2[2]Here’s one for the baseball and softball players, quarterbacks, and shot put and discus throwers (and any other “throwing” athletes).  According to researchers at Auburn University, stronger glute muscles may help you ward off throwing injuries.

Athletes activate their glutes when throwing, stabilizing their core and reducing their risk of shoulder injury.  When you generate power from your lower-body, you reduce stress on the small, injury-prone muscles of the shoulder.

Ironically, these findings aren’t necessarily new.  There have been several studies showing that throwing and “hitting” athletes (baseball and softball players, hockey and lacrosse players, etc.) who are capable of generating large amounts of lower-body force can reduce the stress caused by upper-body rotational torque.

Strengthening your glutes has broad application, and can benefit athletes in everything from running and jumping to throwing to lifting.  Try exercises like deadlifts, hip extensions, and lunges.

Please see related articles:

Strengthen Your Glutes With Hip Raises

Strengthen Your Hips and Glutes with the Mini-Band Lateral Shuffle

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Is the Upright Row Exercise Dangerous?

18 Dec

upright-row-with-barbell-1[1]The upright row exercise (pictured) is popular with bodybuilders, athletes, and general fitness enthusiasts.  It is usually performed to increase upper-back and shoulder muscle size.  The upright row also tends to increase neck girth, making it especially popular with football and rugby players.

Although it is a common strength training exercise, the upright row is not particularly functional, from an athletic performance (movement) training perspective.  Additionally, there are concerns about the short- and long-term safety of this exercise.

The problem occurs when you raise your arms and add resistance in that position.  Every time you raise the weight, a small tendon in your shoulder gets pinched (known as impingement) by the bones in the shoulder.  This  may not hurt immediately.   It may not even hurt for a long time.  The problem is, the tendon can gradually become worn down and damaged.  You may not even know you have a developing problem until serious injury occurs.

The upright row involves considerable medial or internal shoulder rotation. This action creates significant torque within your shoulder joints. This torque, in turn, places a potentially injurious load on the small muscles that control the stability of your shoulder joint, specifically your rotator cuff. Some exercisers find that upright rows place their shoulders in a mechanically disadvantageous position that can result in shoulder pain.

Use a wider grip and limit the range of motion of the upright row exercise by not lifting your upper arms past parallel to the floor, since this increases your risk of shoulder impingement and injury.  If you find upright rows hurt your shoulders, perform lat raises or shrugs for your trapezius muscles instead.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Strengthen Your Glutes

23 Aug

brewkendall_fullsize_story2[2]Here’s one for the baseball and softball players, quarterbacks, and shot put and discus throwers (and any other “throwing” athletes).  According to researchers at Auburn University, stronger glute muscles may help you ward off throwing injuries.

Athletes activate their glutes when throwing, stabilizing their core and reducing their risk of shoulder injury.  When you generate power from your lower-body, you reduce stress on the small, injury-prone muscles of the shoulder.

Ironically, these findings aren’t necessarily new.  There have been several studies showing that throwing and “hitting” athletes (baseball and softball players, hockey and lacrosse players, etc.) who are capable of generating large amounts of lower-body force can reduce the stress caused by upper-body rotational torque.

Strengthening your glutes has broad application, and can benefit athletes in everything from running and jumping to throwing to lifting.  Try exercises like deadlifts, hip extensions, and lunges.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

%d bloggers like this: