Tag Archives: suspension training

Add Suspension Training to Your Workout

29 Jan

TRX Training

Suspension training, also known as suspended bodyweight training, has been around for many years, and continues to gain in popularity.  Products such as the TRX, which we use at our facility, have helped bring suspension training to the forefront of the sports performance and fitness industries.

Suspension training differs from traditional training techniques in that it exploits body angleslever systemsgravity (weight of the athlete), and foot or hand positioning.  With its unique design, the TRX supports neuromuscular groups working synergistically by challenging balance, stability, and proprioception.

Suspension training is a functional training tool that can help athletes improve balance, muscle size, strength, power, mobility, and flexibility.  This type of training allows for a wide variety of different exercises, including versions of well-known exercises like the chest press, inverted row, squat, and hamstring curl (the TRX video library has 194 moves from which to choose).

We especially like suspension training because of its ability to increase core muscle activation and engagement, and — depending on the exercise — “teaches” the athlete to transition effectively and efficiently from one plane to another.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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Suspension Training Builds Muscle, Strength, Performance

5 Jun
TRX Training

TRX Training

When it comes to building muscle and strength, there’s nothing like good old-fashioned weightlifting… right?

The answer is yes, but recent research indicates you may be able to achieve similar results with a suspension trainer like the TRX.

Research from the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine found that subjects who trained on a TRX showed similar improvements compared to those performing traditional, weightlifting exercises.  In the study, scientists found no significant difference between the groups in improvements in strength, power, speed, or jumping ability.

Instability training provides an optimal stimulus for developing strength levels,” says study author José Luis Maté-Muñoz, Ph.D.

At our facility, we like the TRX because of its unique ability to leverage body weight (making it suitable for everyone, regardless of exercise experience or proficiency), and because virtually every exercise requires core activation and engagement.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Get Functionally Fit in 2015

29 Dec

bigstock-Gym-man-and-woman-push-up-stre-40734724[1]It’s New Year’s resolution time and, for some of us, that means a major overhaul of our diet and exercise plans in 2015.

For others, a few modifications to our current regimen is all we’ll need.

And, of course, there will be those of us for whom 2015 — from a fitness perspective — will be “business as usual.”

Regardless of your plan, don’t just get (or stay) fit in 2015… get functionally fit.

Functional training means challenging yourself with exercises that not only build strength, but also require balance and stability.  Avoid or minimize stationary, machine-based exercises that “lock” you into single-joint and/or isolated muscle group movements.

Free weights generally require more balance, stability, and core activation than machines and can also provide for a greater range-of-motion.  And don’t limit yourself to pushing and pulling exercises.  You can use kettlebells and medicine balls to bend, twist, turn, carry, swing, toss, and throw.

Perform more unilateral exercises — those that work one arm, one leg, or one side of the body — as an alternative to traditional bilateral exercises.  Single-leg exercise versions of the squat, Romanian deadlift, and Bulgarian split squat work the entire lower body and prevent the stronger limb from compensating for the weaker one.  The same principle applies to upper-body exercises like single-arm presses and rows.

Perform more exercises on your feet, as opposed to sitting or lying down.  Try using a suspension trainer, like the TRX, and you’ll activate your core with every exercise you do.

If you’re going to do cardio, get away from the traditional slow, steady paced jog.  Incorporate high-intensity interval training into your routine.  Add exercises and drills that require backpedaling, lateral shuffling, hopping, skipping, and lunging.

Do more movement-based training, and less muscle-based training, and you’ll look, feel, function, and perform better than ever.

Looking for some help, guidance and/or direction to get started?  Contact us today via our website.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Add Suspension Training to Your Workout

2 Jun
TRX Training

TRX Training

Suspension training, also known as suspended bodyweight training, has been around for many years, and continues to gain in popularity.  Products such as the TRX, which we use at our facility, have helped bring suspension training to the forefront of the sports performance and fitness industries.

Suspension training differs from traditional training techniques in that it exploits body angles, lever systems, gravity (weight of the athlete), and foot or hand positioning.  With its unique design, the TRX supports neuromuscular groups working synergistically by challenging balance, stability, and proprioception.

Suspension training is a functional training tool that can help athletes improve balance, muscle size, strength, power, and flexibility.  This type of training allows for a wide variety of different exercises, including versions of well-known exercises like the chest press, inverted row, squat, and hamstring curl (the TRX video library has 194 moves from which to choose).

We especially like suspension training because of its ability to increase core muscle activation, and — depending on the exercise — “teaches” the athlete to transition effectively and efficiently from one plane to another.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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