Tag Archives: whey protein

Whey is the Way to Go

29 Mar

When it comes to protein, athletes have lots of different options.  There’s protein from whole foods, like milk protein, egg protein, meat protein, and plant protein.  As a supplement, whey protein, casein protein, and soy protein are among the alternatives.

Additionally, research shows that different types of protein work better at different times of day (and night).

In the morning, whey protein from whole foods (milk, Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, etc.) or a whey protein powder shake can help control cravings all day, according to scientists at the Journal of Nutrition.

Whey is also a good choice for your pre- and post-workout protein because it is quickly and easily digestible.

Another option for your post-workout protein is casein.  Casein is the main protein found in milk and cheese.  Of the true proteins found in milk, about 80% is casein.  The other major protein in milk is whey.  Compared to whey, casein burns more slowly and provides a consistent flow of protein, over time (sort of like a “long-acting” protein).

There are several protein powder supplements that contain both whey and casein proteins (I know of at least one that also contains egg protein).

Studies also show that casein protein, when taken before bed, can increase muscle growth by about 20%.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Spread Out Your Protein

22 Mar

If you want to build muscle, you need to get more protein.  Active individuals should aim for 0.6-0.8 grams of protein per pound of body weight.  Athletes may need even more.

So, how should you distribute your daily protein intake?

Scientists at Skidmore College (NY) found that individuals who divide their daily protein among six smaller meals, instead of three larger ones, build muscle faster.

Start your day with protein, and try to get more than half of your recommended intake by lunch.  Eggs for breakfast are a quick and easy way to get your morning protein.  Add a mid-morning protein shake, and grilled chicken (or other lean meat) and Greek yogurt for lunch.  Peanut butter is another good way to get your protein with any meal or snack, any time of day.

I like preparing a protein shake — 10-12 oz. of chocolate milk and a scoop of chocolate whey protein powder — and sipping it, throughout the day.  It’s an easy way to add 30-40 grams of protein to my daily intake.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Boost Your Metabolism With These Protein-Rich Foods

2 Nov

Protein-Rich-Foods[1]The benefits of dietary protein are well-documented.  Unfortunately, most of us do not get enough protein in our diets.  It is estimated that we should consume 0.6-0.8 grams of protein per pound of body weight, each day, to help protect against age-related muscle loss (that’s 105-140 grams of protein per day for a 175 pound man).  Active individuals should aim for the upper end of this equation, and athletes may need even more.

Additional benefits of adequate dietary protein consumption include:

  • Muscle repair
  • Increases fat-burning
  • Increases satiety (full feeling) after a meal
  • Decreases subsequent energy (calorie) intake
  • Leads to weight loss

I found an interesting article in Prevention magazine that lists several protein-rich food sources that can help you get 20-30 grams of protein at each meal.  I especially like the idea of supplementing your daily protein intake with whey protein powder.  8-10 oz. of milk, mixed with a scoop of whey protein powder, provides 30+ grams of quality protein.  Mix it the night before, then drink it the next day — a few sips, throughout the day — at work, home, school, etc.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Post-Workout Recovery and Performance

1 Apr

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“Rapid recovery between workouts is important for optimal training.  Short-term recovery from competition for competitive athletes is a major focus for athletes and their coaches.  Short-term recovery is a key factor for better performance.” (Enhancing Short-Term Recovery After High-Intensity Anaerobic Exercise; Al-Nawaiser, Ali, M., et.al.; Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research)

Post-workout muscle soreness (pain and stiffness that peaks 24–72 hours post-workout), also known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), is a mostly normal after-effect of exercise or exertion.  DOMS is less related to the duration and intensity of a workout, and more attributable to the novelty (“newness”) or variety of movement.  New and different exercises, drills, and movement patterns seem to have greater potential to induce post-exercise soreness than familiar exercises, even at higher intensity levels.

And, while experts agree that there’s nothing you can do to completely alleviate post-workout soreness, there are some strategies that may be helpful to protect performance, according to a Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research study. (Al-Nawaiser, Ali M., et.al.)

The study examined the effects of antioxidant vitamins, ibuprofen, cold water submersion, and whey protein administered simultaneously on short-term recovery.

Power output, Creatine kinase (a marker of muscle damage), muscle soreness, and rated perceived exertion were measured after 24 hours.

According to the authors, “Treatment was helpful in protecting performance, but this was apparently not due to reduced muscle soreness or damage.”

Given this information, we may need to re-think the rationale for post-workout recovery: Less as a means to reduce soreness, and more as a way to protect performance.

Additionally, it’s important to remember that rest is a vital component of the muscle- and strength-building process.  Sore muscles need time to heal and recover.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Protein 101: Types and Timing

28 Aug

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There’s a lot of discussion (and confusion) about protein consumption and supplementation.

What kind of protein supplement should you use, and when should you use it?

Check out this article to learn more about Types of Protein.

This article provides insight into Protein timing and its effects on muscular hypertrophy and strength in individuals engaged in weight-training.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Get Your (Whey) Protein

1 Jun

pGNC1-13512491dt[1]If you’re not already using a whey protein supplement, what are you waiting for?

In addition to its post-workout, muscle-building potential, whey also helps direct glycogen into fatigued cells, reducing muscle soreness and improving muscle function the day after you train.

Most experts agree that active men and women should ingest 0.6-0.8 grams of protein per pound of their target body weight, daily.

Athletes and more experienced weightlifters may require more protein, as much as a gram (or more) per pound of their target body weight, daily.

Here’s a previous blog post with a simple strategy to increase protein consumption, throughout the day.

Our country is notoriously “over-carbed” and “under-proteined.”  Reduce the carbs and increase the protein intake to look better, feel better, and perform better.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Add an Egg to Your Protein Shake

8 Dec

egg[1]Next time you prepare a post-workout drink, crack an egg (or two) in your whey protein shake.

Egg protein is a high-quality, lactose-free protein source, and makes a great complement to whey protein.  Egg protein stimulates muscle growth and has been demonstrated to increase muscle protein synthesis in university studies.

The egg white and yolk proteins are high in nutrients; one large egg contains about 6.5 grams of protein; and the egg white protein content is about 3.6 grams (slightly more than half of the total protein content).

Egg Protein Benefits

Eggs contain a high concentration of leucine.  Leucine is the major amino acid responsible for stimulating the synthesis of muscle protein after a meal (the only protein source that contains more leucine than egg is whey).

Egg protein contains 10% to 20% more leucine than most other protein sources.  It is more anabolic (muscle-building) than both soy and wheat protein.  Egg protein increases lean-body mass more than both of those protein sources — even at equal intakes.

Egg protein is quickly and easily digestible, at a rate similar to whey protein.  Consumption and digestion of egg protein leads to a large increase in plasma amino acids and commensurate muscle-building response.

Consuming egg protein promotes satiety (fullness) and can reduce short-term food intake, which may be beneficial for people looking to lose fat — but don’t want to feel like they’re starving themselves in the process.

Egg protein is also a great source of important vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Chocolate Protein Pudding Pops

23 Jun

29639_chocolate_pudding_pops_620[1]I’m always looking for fun and creative ways to get more protein in my diet.  And since, invariably, most of my clients can also benefit by increasing their protein consumption, they often ask me for suggestions.

One of my favorite treats is chocolate protein pudding.  I prepare it by blending one packet of sugar-free chocolate pudding mix with 16 ounces of milk and one scoop of chocolate protein powder.  This simple recipe makes four – 4 ounce servings, with about 10 grams of protein per serving.

I recently came across a recipe for Chocolate Protein Pudding Pops.  This frozen treat is delicious, nutritious, and perfect for summertime.  Here’s how to make them:

  • 3 scoops chocolate whey protein powder
  • 4 cups nonfat vanilla (Greek) yogurt
  • 1/2 cup skim milk

Combine all of the ingredients in a blender and mix thoroughly. Pour into popsicle molds and place in your freezer overnight. Enjoy!

Makes eight – 4 ounce popsicles

Nutrient Content (per serving): Calories: 90, Total Fat: 1g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Cholesterol: 17mg, Sodium : 97mg, Total Carbohydrates: 9g, Sugars: 7g, Fiber: 1g, Protein: 15g

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Whey is the Way to Go

29 Nov

optimum-nutrition-casein-protein[1]When it comes to protein, athletes have lots of different options.  There’s protein from whole foods, like milk protein, egg protein, meat protein, and plant protein.  As a supplement, whey protein, casein protein, and soy protein are among the alternatives.

Additionally, research shows that different types of protein work better at different times of day (and night).

In the morning, whey protein from whole foods (milk, Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, etc.) or a whey protein powder shake can help control cravings all day, according to scientists at the Journal of Nutrition.

Whey is also a good choice for your pre- and post-workout protein because it is quickly and easily digestible.

Another option for your post-workout protein is casein.  Casein is the main protein found in milk and cheese.  Of the true proteins found in milk, about 80% is casein.  The other major protein in milk is whey.  Compared to whey, casein burns more slowly and provides a consistent flow of protein, over time (sort of like a “long-acting” protein).

There are several protein powder supplements that contain both whey and casein proteins (I know of at least one that also contains egg protein).

Studies also show that casein protein, when taken before bed, can increase muscle growth by about 20%.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Spread Out Your Protein

22 Nov

Different kinds of meat, eggs and two bottles of milkIf you want to build muscle, you need to get more protein.  Active individuals should aim for 0.6-0.8 grams of protein per pound of body weight.  Athletes may need even more.

So, how should you distribute your daily protein intake?

Scientists at Skidmore College (NY) found that individuals who divide their daily protein among six smaller meals, instead of three larger ones, build muscle faster.

Start your day with protein, and try to get more than half of your recommended intake by lunch.  Eggs for breakfast are a quick and easy way to get your morning protein.  Add a mid-morning protein shake, and grilled chicken (or other lean meat) and Greek yogurt for lunch.  Peanut butter is another good way to get your protein with any meal or snack, any time of day.

I like preparing a protein shake — 10-12 oz. of milk and a scoop of chocolate whey protein powder — and sipping it, throughout the day.  It’s an easy way to add 30-40 grams of protein to my daily intake.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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