Tag Archives: workout motivation

What’s Your Workout Motivation?

1 May

Why do you workout?  (and, conversely, why don’t you workout?)

Are you working toward a goal or do you just enjoy the process?

Is it for health and wellness?  Do you want to improve your quality (and quantity) of life?

Do you want to look better, perhaps get more lean and muscular?  (I saw a quote, recently, that said, “Diet if you want to look better in clothes; workout if you want to look better naked.”)

Do you want to feel better?  Are you working out to improve your energy level or functional movement?

Are you trying to lose a few pounds and, perhaps, get closer to your ideal body weight and reduce stress on your joints?

Do you work out with a friend or group of friends and enjoy the social interaction?

Do you want to get stronger, faster, and more athletic?  Is one of your goals to improve your performance?

Are you doing it for you, or for someone else?

The bottom line is, there is no wrong reason — and no one right reason — for working out (they’re all right).  As that shoe company says, “just do it.”

Please tag me back with a comment and share your motivation for working out (or your reason for not working out).  I will compile a list and share the best responses in a future blog post.  Thanks, in advance, for your feedback.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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What’s Your Workout Motivation?

27 Dec

Men-and-women-working-out1-400x250[1]Why do you workout?  (and, conversely, why don’t you workout?)

Are you working toward a goal or do you just enjoy the process?

Is it for health and wellness?  Do you want to improve your quality (and quantity) of life?

Do you want to look better, perhaps get more lean and muscular?  (I saw a quote, recently, that said, “Diet if you want to look better in clothes; workout if you want to look better naked.”)

Do you want to feel better?  Are you working out to improve your energy level or functional movement?

Are you trying to lose a few pounds and, perhaps, get closer to your ideal body weight and reduce stress on your joints?

Do you work out with a friend or group of friends and enjoy the social interaction?

Do you want to get stronger, faster, and more athletic?  Is one of your goals to improve your performance?

Are you doing it for you, or for someone else?

The bottom line is, there is no wrong reason — and no one right reason — for working out (they’re all right).  As that shoe company says, “just do it.”

Please tag me back with a comment and share your motivation for working out (or your reason for not working out).  I will compile a list and share the best responses in a future blog post, shortly after the first of the year.  Thanks, in advance, for your feedback.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

You’ve Got to MAKE Time for Strength and Conditioning

14 Nov

“I don’t/didn’t have time.”  As a Strength and Conditioning Specialist who works with hundreds of athletes/clients, I hear that frequently.  Oddly, I rarely hear it from my goal-oriented, high achievers.  It’s one thing to know what needs to be done; it’s another thing to do it.

Here’s the key:  You can’t wait until you “have” time, and/or conditions are “perfect.”  There are going to be days when your schedule is hectic and/or you don’t feel like working out.  If it’s important, you’ve got to make time.  Here are some tips:

  • Rise and shine.  Early AM workouts are a great way to start your day.
  • Workout with a buddy or group.  This strategy is motivating and keeps you accountable.
  • Cut out distractions.  Scale back the time you spend on your cell phone, computer, social media, and television.
  • Make it a priority.  Schedule exercise into your day/week as you would any other appointment.
  • Use time wisely.  Be efficient, and focus on quality over quantity.  Even an abbreviated workout is better than none.
  • Break it up.  If you don’t have time for a complete workout, try scheduling shorter intervals throughout the day.
  • Add some variety.  Try different workouts, like cardio or yoga.
  • Chart your progress.  Keep an exercise journal.
  • Be realistic, but challenge yourself.
  • Get help from a qualified, experienced Strength and Conditioning Professional.

Write down your goals and revisit them often.  Refocus on your priorities and stay motivated.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

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