Tag Archives: produce

Eat Protein and Produce at Every Meal

26 Apr

Whole foods are best for building muscle, because they contain vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other micro-nutrients that you don’t always get in supplements.  “If your food used to have a face or grow in the ground, it’s appropriate to eat,” says Bill Hartman, PT, CSCS.

To maximize the impact your diet has on building muscle and getting stronger, make protein and produce the centerpiece of every meal.  Grilled or blackened chicken or salmon, with a side of sautéed broccoli, make a great “go-to” meal, and can be prepared in advance.  Stick with lean protein sources, colorful fruits, and green vegetables.  When preparing your meals, avoid sauces, glazes, and dressings that pack on fat and calories.

Peanut butter (and nuts like almonds, cashews, and pistachios) and Greek yogurt are great choices, convenient, and portable.

For planning purposes, there are some fruits and vegetables that actually retain more of their flavor and nutrients frozen than fresh, including corn, peas, spinach, blueberries, and cherries.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Advertisements

Eat for Better Hydration

15 Jun

642x361-The_5_Best_Watermelon_Seed_Benefits[1]Summer is here and, although hydration is always important, it can be difficult to drink enough to stay hydrated when temperatures climb.

Fortunately, you can get plenty of fluid through your food – more specifically, fresh summer produce.

Here are a few examples of fruits and vegetables, and their water content:

  • 1 watermelon wedge = 10 ounces of water
  • 1 medium peach = 5 oz.
  • 1 cup sliced strawberries = 5 oz.
  • 1 cup sliced cucumber = 4 oz.
  • 1 medium tomato = 4 oz.
  • 1 cup chopped raw zucchini = 4 oz.
  • 1 ear cooked corn on the cob = 3 oz.

Supplement your hydration and improve your nutrition with fresh summer fruits and veggies.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Eat Your Way to Fitness

8 Jun

8c08f343446b14128f6f9df8dd797ddb[1]Exercise is important, but you can’t “out-train” a bad diet.  If you’re serious about results, regardless of your strength and fitness goals, your exercise and nutrition plans need to be aligned.

Complement your efforts in the weight room by following these three simple Diet & Nutrition rules:

  1. Limit the junk.  Snacking on high-calorie, low-nutrient foods like sweets, chips, and soda will sabotage your strength and fitness plan.  And, while I’m not a fan of an extreme, fanatical approach to diet and nutrition — moderation is the key — you’ve got to limit these foods to no more than 10% of your intake, or about 200-250 “junk” calories per day.
  2. Make protein a priority.  Active men and women should aim for at least 0.6-0.8 grams of protein per pound of their target body weight, daily.  Athletes and more experienced weightlifters may require more protein, as much as a gram (or more) per pound of their target body weight, daily.  Increasing your protein intake can help you feel fuller longer, increase muscle growth, and boost your metabolism.
  3. Eat more produce.  Add more (whole) fruit to your diet to provide your muscles with carbohydrates to fuel your training.  You’ll get the added benefit of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and phytonutrients to keep you healthy.  Aim for 2-4 servings a day.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

Eat Protein and Produce at Every Meal

20 Dec

salmon+and+spicy+broccoli+2[1]Whole foods are best for building muscle, because they contain vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other micro-nutrients that you don’t always get in supplements.  “If your food used to have a face or grow in the ground, it’s appropriate to eat,” says Bill Hartman, PT, CSCS.

To maximize the impact your diet has on building muscle and getting stronger, make protein and produce the centerpiece of every meal.  Grilled or blackened chicken or salmon, with a side of sautéed broccoli, make a great “go-to” meal, and can be prepared in advance.  Stick with lean protein sources, colorful fruits, and green vegetables.  When preparing your meals, avoid sauces, glazes, and dressings that pack on fat and calories.

Peanut butter (and nuts like almonds, cashews, and pistachios) and Greek yogurt are great choices, convenient, and portable.

For planning purposes, there are some fruits and vegetables that actually retain more of their flavor and nutrients frozen than fresh, including corn, peas, spinach, blueberries, and cherries.

Get STRONGER, Get FASTER!

Your thoughts?

%d bloggers like this: